1 Week In The Faroe Islands

Travel Itinerary

Viewed: 1693 times
0 ratings

Profile image
Itinerary by: Dan Hill
4 months ago
Traveller
Culture-Church Culture-Statue Eat & Drink-Bar Eat & Drink-Cafe Eat & Drink-Restaurant Nature-Beach Nature-Cliffs Nature-Estuary Nature-Hill Nature-Island Nature-Lagoon Nature-Lake Nature-Mountain Nature-Ocean Nature-Rock formation Nature-View point Nature-Waterfall Outdoor Events-Birdwatching Settlement-City Settlement-Hamlet Settlement-Village Transport-Airport Transport-Boat trip Transport-Car rental Transport-Ferry port Transport-Heliport
Duration: 6 days

Here's the itinerary for a 6 day trip to the stunning Faroe Islands, which I visited in July 2018. It should have been a 7 day trip but alas poor visibility at the Faroe Islands meant that our plane did not depart Copenhagen on our first day! The Faroe Islands are a true paradise for lovers of hiking, dramatic scenery and nature. This trip to the Faroe Islands remains one of my favourite vacations ever for a number of reasons. Firstly, the scenery is simply stunning. Secondly, the remote location and island life holds a certain romantic feel. Thirdly, while you will certainly encounter other tourists on your trip, the Faroe Islands remain a bit of a hidden treasure and you will certainly find peace and tranquility on this trip. This itinerary is focused on short hikes (1-3 hours max), some sightseeing and a fantastic boat trip from Vestmanna to see the puffins flying from the cliffs. It should give you a great overview of the islands. Some personal means of transport is essential - and the small car we hired at the airport was perfect for summer driving. Weather can be quite mixed - and although we visited in July, the temperature was around 12C during the day-time. Bring full waterproofs and dress in layers to allow for changing conditions. A good back-pack with hiking supplies like hats, gloves, plasters for blisters, snacks and drinks is essential. The currency is Danish Kroner (DKK), as the Faroe Islands are part of the Kingdom of Denmark. The language is Faroese, but everyone we spoke with was fluent in English. We stayed in a self-catering AirBnb in the centre of the capital city - Tórshavn - which enabled us to try several restaurants for dinner in the evening.

Day 1

Arrival Day

Vagar airport is located remotely and in close proximity to hiking trails so once we had collected our luggage and picked up our rental car, we headed for our first taste of the breathtaking scenery to be found on The Faroe Islands. Sørvágsvatn / Leitisvatn - The Cliff Lake is located a short drive from the airport and is perfect starter-hike for the start of your vacation. You will be rewarded with stunning views of a lake perched on cliffs over the ocean, with a waterfall connecting the two.
14:30 - 16:00
Vágar Airport
Vágar Airport, Faroe Islands
Vágar Airport is located on the island of Vágar and is the airport serving the Faroe Islands. Originally built by British Royal Engineers during the second world war, the runway's construction can best be appreciated when driving away from the airport. The flight inbound to the Faroes gives breathtaking views of the islands below. The planes fly in quite close to the hillsides. Planes landing at the airport are from either Atlantic Airways or Scandinavian Airlines (SAS). Cancellations can occur if visibility is low, as happened when I tried to fly out to the Faroes from Copenhagen with SAS - and my flight was rescheduled for the following day. A note on car-hire: book well in advance. On our trip to the Faroe Islands in summer 2018, we had to shop around independent car hire specialists due to other cars being all rented out (this was a couple of weeks before our due arrival). In the end, we rented from a man who owned 3 cars who brought the car to the airport for us. Our car seemed at least 5 years old, very basic, but road-worthy and did the job. Tip: if you are flying into Vágar Airport for the start of your holiday to the Faroe Islands and think you may like some wine, beer or spirits during your trip, strongly consider visiting duty free at the airport. Alcoholic drinks are heavily taxed on the islands, and most visitors and locals that I saw arriving loaded up on their allowance before going through customs.
Article By: Dan Hill
Eat & Drink-Bar Eat & Drink-Cafe Eat & Drink-Restaurant Transport-Airport Transport-Car rental Transport-Heliport

Notes

Don't forget to make good use of the duty-free at the airport if that is your thing - as alcohol is much cheaper than in the shops on the islands.

Getting there

You'll likely need some personal means of transportation during your stay on the Faroe Islands. I would strongly recommend booking a hire car for pickup from the airport well in advance. Watch out for speed cameras - of which there are several on the islands.

16:00 - 18:00
Sørvágsvatn / Leitisvatn - The Cliff Lake
Sørvágsvatn, Faroe Islands
The Cliff Lake - locally known as either Sørvágsvatn or Leitisvatn - is situated on the island of Vágar in the Faroe Islands. It is a short drive from the airport, and after our rental car pickup, was the first place we stopped at. We parked on a little lane off the main road and climbed over a stile to the start of the path. The path is a walking track and took us about half an hour from the start to end. Walking shoes were good to have - boots probably would have been more sensible. Take waterproofs as there's nowhere to shelter if the weather changes. The view from start to finish is magnificent. On our visit, in summer 2018, the path along the lake front was closed, and we took a path a little up the hillside, with the lake on our right. We encountered a few friendly sheep along the way, as well as friendly fellow hikers. At the end of the trail is a greeting that set the standards for breath-taking views during our trip - magnificent cliff faces sinking into the ocean far below. Take very good care and don't go too close to the edge! Where lake meets cliff, a stunning waterfall drains the lake into the ocean. The colours were striking - the green hillsides, the deep blue ocean and the grey rocks. This walk was fairly easy in intensity and an incredible start to our trip to the Faroes - getting the circulation going after the plane ride in and firing up the adventurous spirit.
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Cliffs Nature-Hill Nature-Lake Nature-Ocean Nature-View point Nature-Waterfall Social Distance-Social distance friendly

19:00 - 21:00
Tórshavn
Tórshavn, Faroe Islands
Tórshavn is the capital city of the Faroe Islands and is home to around 20,000 people. The parliament and government is situated in Tórshavn, including the prime minister's office. Of particular interest to tourists is Tinganes - which is the old part of town. Houses here are generally wooden with grass roofs - and date back up to 500 years. There's also a harbour to walk around, as well as lots of small passage ways passing between the houses to wander. There's a historical museum as well as an art museum - Listasavn Føroya. There are a number of bars and restaurants that should cater for everyone - I recommend taking a walk around the harbour area and nearby streets to explore. Seafood lovers will not be disappointed.
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Ocean Settlement-City

Notes

We stayed in an AirBnb rental for our entire stay - located in central Tórshavn. This location was ideal for eating out as well as sightseeing in the evenings after a day out hiking.

Day 2

Hiking on Kalsoy

Day 2 was our first full day on the Faroe Islands and we decided to drive up to the island of Kalsoy. Take a car ferry from the port in Klaksvik for the short trip. When on Kalsoy, try the hike to the Kallur lighthouse from Trøllanes. It's a relatively easy walk - although keep to the path to avoid disturbing the wildlife - especially the birds. You will be rewarded with simply stunning scenery at the lighthouse - of the cliffs and of the other islands across the sea. Later, head to the Selkie Statue and learn about the local legend of the seal woman. After visiting the Selkie Statue, we headed back to our accommodation in Torshavn
10:15 - 10:45
Ferry to Kalsoy - Klaksvik to Syðradalur
Ferjulega, Stangavegur, Klaksvík, Faroe Islands
The car ferry to the island of Kalsoy departs from the port in Klaksvík. The ferry arrives at Syðradalur on Kalsoy. Departure times are seasonal and you should check the timetable online (see link). The journey takes approximately 20 minutes. Arrive in good time - at least 15 minutes before hand.
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Ocean Transport-Ferry port

Notes

It's advisable to get to the car ferry in good time - at least 15 minutes before departure. On our crossing day there were quite a few vehicles waiting to board.

11:45 - 14:00
Trøllanes - Kallur lighthouse - Kalsoy
Trøllanes, Faroe Islands
Trøllanes is a village on the island of Kalsoy. We crossed to Kalsoy via a short ferry ride from Klaksvik and drove up to the village. The road cuts away through mountain-sides where necessary through tunnels which are a marvel of engineering. We parked at a small carpark in the village of Trøllanes for our hike to the Kallur lighthouse on the coast. The carpark had toilet facilities. The path itself is clearly marked from the start and is easily found from the village. The walk is approximately 3-4 kilometres but some of the terrain can be steep. Take good walking shoes - preferably boots. We did the walk in summer of 2018, and there were signs clearly stating that walkers should stick to the marked paths. We saw one walker who wandered across the moors and who was dive-bombed repeatedly by a very aggressive bird - so take heed. The views along the walk are splendid - lush green hillsides, steep mountainous slopes on one side, and the ocean with incredible views of cliffs stretching toward the horizon on the other side. Once reaching the lighthouse, the cliff views are simply stunning. Set aside some time to spend wandering around the hills and paths around the lighthouse end of the trail.
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Cliffs Nature-Hill Nature-Mountain Nature-Ocean Nature-View point Social Distance-Social distance friendly

14:30 - 15:00
Mikladalur - Kópakonan - Selkie Statue
16 Bakkavegur, Mikladalur 797, Faroe Islands
While on the island of Kalsoy, a visit to the village of Mikladalur (population 44) is a must - to see the Selkie Statue - "Kópakonan". Mygledal in Danish means "Great Valley" and Mikladalur is the Faroese equivalent. The statue at Milkadalur was erected in August 2014 to commemorate the legend. A 450 kilogram bronze statue, it is set on the rocks and designed to withstand 13 metre waves from the sea. You can walk down to the beach from statue and pass a small waterfall along the way. Access to the statue is via steps from the village, past the old post office. There are toilet facilities in the village for visitors. The legend of Kópakonan is one of the best known folk-tales on the Faroe Islands, but a similar legend can be found across many cultures - from the Faroe Islands, to Scotland and Ireland in the south and Iceland to the north. In one interpretation, Selkies are mythological beings who can change form from seal to human. In another interpretation, it is believed that seals are incarnations of people who have chosen to die in the sea. On the Christian festival of the Twelfth Night (the Twelfth day of Christmas, and the start of Epiphany), it is said that the seals come onto land and transform back into humans. They shed their seal skins and celebrate by dancing in the human form. In this Faroese interpretation of the legend, a young gentleman who was a farmer, decided that on the Twelfth Night he would go see the selkie dancing for himself, down on the beach. He becomes obsessed with one of the selkie girls dancing and desires her for himself. In order to prevent her returning to the ocean, he hid her seal skin. As the evening of selkie dancing came to a close, he approached the girl to convince her to marry him. To force the marriage, he put the seal skin in a locked chest, to which only he had the key. Years passed, and together, they raised several children. One day, the young farmer went out fishing on his boat. All of a sudden, he realised that he had forgotten his key to the locked chest. Panicked, he raced back to shore, but alas, it was too late - his selkie wife had found the key, unlocked the chest, retaken her seal skin, and swam out to sea. In order to prevent harm to the children, the selkie woman had put out the fire, and removed anything sharp. The men of the village of Mikladalur liked to hunt seals for food - and one day they made plans to set off on an expedition down to one of the local caverns. In a dream, the selkie woman appeared to the farmer to warn him not to attack a seal bull that would be lying at the entrance to the cave - for that was her seal-husband, nor two seal pups (Hárek and Fredrik) that would be deep inside the cave - for those were her children. Alas, the farmer did not relay his dream to his compatriots, and on the day of the hunt, all of the seals in the cave were slain. The farmer himself was presented with the flippers of the two pups, as his share of the catch. That evening, as the head of the great bull seal, and the flippers of the young pups were cooked, the selkie woman burst in, and took the form of an angry troll. The troll passed a curse the men of the village of Mikladalur as a revenge, stating that some would fall from the surrounding mountains, and that others would die at sea. This would continue, she said, until the dead numbered enough as to link hands around the entire island of Kalsoy. And with that, there was a crash of thunder, and she was never seen again. To this day, whenever a local man dies on a mountain or at sea, it is said that this is because there must not yet be enough dead to link men to link hands around the entire island.
Article By: Dan Hill
Culture-Statue Nature-Beach Nature-View point Settlement-Hamlet Social Distance-Social distance friendly

Day 3

Climbing Villingadalsfjall

The climb up Villingadalsfjall is steep but the views were worth it! Do not miss a hike up Villingadalsfjall on your Faroe Islands trip!
11:30 - 14:30
Villingadalsfjall - Viðareiði - Viðoy - hike
Vidareidi, Faroe Islands
Villingadalsfjall is the third highest peak in the Faroe Islands and stands at 841m. It's a great mountain to burn off some excess energy - as it can be a very steep walk. On our ascent, which we did in the summer of 2018, the heavens opened and we had very strong winds and lashing rain during almost the entire climb. We were very grateful for good waterproofs and sturdy boots. Given the steepness of the climb, I was happy that I had brought some plasters to repair my blisters at the top - as my ankles were not used to this kind of wear. I only wished I had brought waterproof gloves with me to keep my hands warm. Given the low visibility, the blue plastic poles that had been laid out regularly along the trail, were extremely useful in ensuring that we remained on track. A tough climb given the conditions - and cold (even though it was July) - however we were fortunate that the skies cleared enough at the peak to allow us to grab a couple of shots of the unique view - spectacular geography that looks like a hollowed out mountain. The walk / climb down was tricky, especially on the wet, slippery rocks, so ensure you give yourself enough time for the descent.
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Lake Nature-Mountain Nature-View point Social Distance-Social distance friendly

Day 4
10:00 - 12:00
Vestmanna Birdcliffs and Grottos - boat trip
5R3X+8R Vestmanna, Faroe Islands
If you're into bird watching - or just fancy a boat ride out through narrow sounds, then the Vestmanna Birdcliffs and Grottos boat trip is for you. The boat departs from near the Tourist Information Centre in Vestmanna (itself worth a visit - for gifts and the restaurant). When we took the trip in summer 2018, the boat was filled with guests, so it could be a good idea to book in advance from the operator (see link). We were lucky to go on a dry day, but I would recommend you take full waterproofs in case of a rain shower if you wish to be on-deck. The boat itself has a large seated cabin if you want to be indoors. Hard hats are provided as the boat nears rocks and cliffs. The trip is about 2 hours in duration, and there is a live guided commentary in English (I seem to remember other languages were offered) - related to things to look out for. This could be geographical features, information regarding local farming techniques, interesting snippets about homes on the cliffs, and of course a wealth of information regarding the bird life. We saw countless puffins and other birds on our trip - you won't be disappointed. Children under 6 are free.
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Cliffs Nature-Estuary Nature-Island Nature-Ocean Nature-View point Outdoor Events-Birdwatching Transport-Boat trip

Notes

I can highly recommend this boat trip to get a glimpse of the Faroe Islands and its wildlife from the sea. After the trip, we had lunch in the restaurant at the tourist information centre next-door. The tourist information centre also has a great gift shop.

14:00 - 16:00
Saksun - hike - Faroe Islands
Saksun, Faroe Islands
Saksun is a remote Faroese village of just 14 inhabitants with its own chapel from 1858, and a tidal lagoon. We visited Saksun in order to attempt the hike to Haldorsvik. The walk from the start is steep, but well-trodden and sign posted in its early stages. The walk climbs quickly, revealing a stunning view of the lagoon and the surrounding valley. After around 60 minutes we reached a plateau and walked in what we thought was the right direction - following cairns. However we soon realised we had lost the trail. It was clear which way we needed to return, so we didn't fear getting lost. If you are intending on hiking from Saksun, make sure you’re clear on directions! What struck me on the walk was a real sense of remoteness and being in true wilderness. We had to be very careful not to disturb birds, as we were dive-bombed a couple of times, and needed to retreat. Back down in the village, we walked around the chapel grounds - which houses a graveyard for the village. There are toilet and parking facilities in the village for visitors.
Article By: Dan Hill
Culture-Church Nature-Hill Nature-Lagoon Nature-Mountain Nature-Ocean Nature-View point Nature-Waterfall Settlement-Hamlet Social Distance-Social distance friendly

Day 5
11:30 - 13:30
Slættaratindur - hike to summit
Slættaratindur, Faroe Islands
Slættaratindur is the highest peak on the Faroe Islands - at 880 metres. Of course, the hike up the mountain does not start at sea level - rather the track we took started a significant way up the mountain from a small car park, and over a stile. As with many trails in the Faroe Islands, this trail is distinguished by its incredibly steep sections - which almost feel like 45 degree inclines (I am sure they are not quite this steep). On our ascent in summer 2018, we had clear weather when we set off, but the peak was clearly in the clouds. The walk to the peak from the car park took about 45 minutes of intense walking. We were very glad for the well-marked trail - as near the peak the visibility dropped to only a few metres. We had our packed-lunch on the top, finding some large rocks to shelter us from the wind. Unfortunately due to the visibility, it was difficult to find the trail back down the mountain again, so I had to rely on a back-track function on my GPS watch to get me to the path. A simple compass would have done the trick - but just be aware that it can be disorientating in the fog. The views across the valley - which were clear for us about half way up the climb - were spectacular!
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Mountain Nature-View point Social Distance-Social distance friendly

14:00 - 15:00
Gjógv - Faroe Islands
Gjogv, Faroe Islands
Along the shores of the village of Gjógv, the lava that once flowed toward the sea is clearly visible. This picturesque village of 50 inhabitants lies on the island of Eysturoy, and we visited it after our morning climb up the mountain of Slættaratindur. Walking down from the car park, I was struck by the children playing on the stream which runs through the centre of village. There was a dammed section where they were playing with small boats made out of old plastic barrels - and having a great time. The wooden houses in the village are painted colourfully in the traditional Scandinavian yellows, reds and whites. There is an air of a simple life to the village - something lost to the majority of tourists who would visit. The mountainous view across the sea is stunning. At the heart of the village lies a church dating back 1929.
Article By: Dan Hill
Culture-Church Eat & Drink-Cafe Eat & Drink-Restaurant Nature-Beach Nature-Hill Nature-Rock formation Nature-View point Settlement-Village

Day 6

Departure Day

Our flight back to Copenhagen was scheduled to leave from Vagar airport in the early evening - leaving plenty of time in the afternoon to view the wondrous Mulafossur waterfall at the tiny hamlet of Gasadalur. Don't skip Gasadalur - or you'll miss out on a truly spectacular photo opportunity as well a shop selling local crafts and artwork.
14:00 - 15:00
Mulafossur waterfall - Gásadalur - Vagar island
Gasadalur, Faroe Islands
Gásadalur is a hamlet with only a small handful of houses - situated on the island of Vagar. Closed off to the outside world except via day long hike up the mountain - the village was opened up to traffic via the construction of a tunnel through the mountain - which was completed in 2004. The picturesque Mulafossur waterfall runs from the steep cliffs down into the ocean below - making for a fabulous photograph. A few of the houses in the village have opened up to sell goods to tourists - such as artwork.
Article By: Dan Hill
Nature-Cliffs Nature-Mountain Nature-Ocean Nature-View point Nature-Waterfall Settlement-Hamlet Social Distance-Social distance friendly

16:00 - 18:00
Vágar Airport
Vágar Airport, Faroe Islands
Vágar Airport is located on the island of Vágar and is the airport serving the Faroe Islands. Originally built by British Royal Engineers during the second world war, the runway's construction can best be appreciated when driving away from the airport. The flight inbound to the Faroes gives breathtaking views of the islands below. The planes fly in quite close to the hillsides. Planes landing at the airport are from either Atlantic Airways or Scandinavian Airlines (SAS). Cancellations can occur if visibility is low, as happened when I tried to fly out to the Faroes from Copenhagen with SAS - and my flight was rescheduled for the following day. A note on car-hire: book well in advance. On our trip to the Faroe Islands in summer 2018, we had to shop around independent car hire specialists due to other cars being all rented out (this was a couple of weeks before our due arrival). In the end, we rented from a man who owned 3 cars who brought the car to the airport for us. Our car seemed at least 5 years old, very basic, but road-worthy and did the job. Tip: if you are flying into Vágar Airport for the start of your holiday to the Faroe Islands and think you may like some wine, beer or spirits during your trip, strongly consider visiting duty free at the airport. Alcoholic drinks are heavily taxed on the islands, and most visitors and locals that I saw arriving loaded up on their allowance before going through customs.
Article By: Dan Hill
Eat & Drink-Bar Eat & Drink-Cafe Eat & Drink-Restaurant Transport-Airport Transport-Car rental Transport-Heliport

Privacy:
public
About the author

I’ve lived in 5 different countries so far: the UK, France, USA, Canada and Denmark. I’ve also visited 33 countries in 5 continents for vacations. We're building MapADay to help people get the most out of their free time - via building a directory of great travel articles combined with local events - and algorithms that can serve users with relevant content. As we all face a new reality with the climate & virus challenges ahead, I hope that MapADay will enable users to discover exciting experiences not only on long distance vacations, but also closer to home. I've really enjoyed building the MapADay platform - and contributing content. If you enjoy using it, we'd love you to contribute too - by leaving a review, adding your own favourite places or sharing your own itineraries.

Sign in to get started

  • Create your profile to get perfect matches
  • Enable Likes Comments and Bookmarks
  • Share your own places and events
  • Create and share itineraries
  • Follow your favourite contributors
  • Sign-up for personal daily events newsletter
  • Switch between Me Family or Friends profiles
Sign up for free