Seville: The Perfect Cultural Weekend Guide

Travel Itinerary

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Laura R. Godoy
Itinerary by: Laura R. Godoy
a month ago
Travel Writer
Duration: 2 days

Magic, charm, orange blossom scent, colourful dresses and flamenco music… There are many reasons to explain why the Southern capital of Spain is so fascinating and has won everybody’s heart for decades. For many visitors, the essence of the country is represented in this city blessed with long-lasting traditions, a delicious gastronomy and open-hearted, fun people. If you are learning Spanish, however, you may find the accent of Sevillians a little difficult to understand, but they will compensate with their welcoming nature and sense of humour. After a visit to Seville, if you are not completely in love with the city, you can ask for your money back! Since Seville has a lot to offer in many aspects, you will find here an itinerary to help you make the most of your two-day visit. WHEN TO COME TO SEVILLE The weather in the South of Spain is warm and in the summer months the heat is quite extreme. On the other hand, in winter, temperatures don’t usually go below zero but the best season to visit Seville is certainly spring. The flowers blooming and the incredible scent of orange flowers and jasmine, together with the mild temperature, make it the best moment of the year to visit a city that captivates you through your senses, as the inhabitants say. The only thing to take into account is that in spring, there are two very important celebrations for the Sevillians: The Feria de Abril, or April Fair, and Easter. THE HOLY WEEK AND THE FERIA DE ABRIL It’s very difficult to imagine how people from Seville celebrate Easter if you haven’t been there during that time. Holy Week processions take place in different parts of the city, carrying heavy floats with the figures of virgins and Christ belonging to the different brotherhoods. It’s really something worth living once in your life. The problem is that the city is packed and if you don’t plan ahead, it will be impossible to find accommodation. The other drawback is that these festivals result in the highest price of hotels. Seville’s most cherished and popular celebrations continue three weeks later with the Feria de Abril, a fair which takes over the city for a week with its colours, music, food and joyful atmosphere. It begins with the “alumbrao” or lighting of all the fair lights, and for seven days there is constant dancing, tasting of delicious (and fatty) food and white wine in the fairground. In fact, the night of the “alumbrao” is also known as the night of “pescaíto frito” (fried fish). The typical dance of the region, the “Sevillanas” contributes to the colour and cheerfulness of the atmosphere. The problem of finding hotels and not paying extremely high prices is also true during the week of the Feria. Another detail is that many “casetas” or stands of the fair are private and you need to know someone there to be invited. If you don’t know anyone in the feria, you will be able to walk the fairground seeing people having fun and go to the few stands which are public, normally political party stands. The last thing to know about the fair is what exactly is “rebujito” (little mixture): white wine from the region, lime soft drink, mint and ice. It’s refreshing and when you are sweating from dancing sevillanas you will long for it, but be careful with how many glasses you take because you could get really drunk in half an hour! TRANSPORTATION Seville doesn’t have a transportation network as extensive as the one in Madrid or Barcelona, but getting around by metro or bus is still an interesting option. The best way to save money in that sense is to buy a card called “Tarjeta turística” for 1 or 3 days, for 5 or 10 euros respectively. You will have unlimited journeys for all the family. CULTURAL INTERESTS Andalucía, or the Southern region of Spain whose capital is Seville, is the cradle of Spanish cultural traditions such as flamenco or the “Sevillanas” dance. It’s also related to bullfighting, a controversial tradition that is cherished by older citizens and questioned by many young ones. Not in vain, this dance of the matador or torero with the impressive toro bravo, an animal that weights half a tonne, was made famous the world over by universal writers such as Hemingway. The world of the twenty-first century doesn’t accept the torture of an animal in the name of art or tradition, but bullfighting still attracts lots of visitors and is still an important part of Sevillians’ way of life. Photo credit: Jacob Díaz

Day 1

10:00 - 12:00
Seville River Cruise
P.º de Cristóbal Colón, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
A cruise on the Guadalquivir River is a great introduction to Seville: you can enjoy a beautiful overview of the city. If the weather is sunny, as it is generally in the Andalusian capital, this can be a really lovely way to start your trip. After going as far as the Cartuja island, where the '92 universal exhibition was held, you will return to the starting point, one of the iconic monuments of the city, the Torre del Oro or Gold Tower. Photo credit: David Mark. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy
Standard 15.00 EUR
Kids 2.00 EUR Under 12

12:00 - 12:30
Torre del Oro
P.º de Cristóbal Colón, s/n, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
This defensive tower is located on the bank of the Guadalquivir and it dates back to the twelfth and fourteenth century. Its function was to defend the city from invasions by the river. Photo credit: Jaime Pf. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy
Standard 3.00 EUR
Group 1.50 EUR
Students 1.50 EUR
Kids 0.00 EUR Under 6
Seniors 1.50 EUR

12:30 - 14:00
Bodega Las Columnas
C. Rodrigo Caro, 1, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
The Bodega Las Columnas tapas bar is one of the classics of the city and everybody knows it in the Santa Cruz quarter. Visitors also return because they can enjoy some of the best Sevillian typical tapas, plus good draught and the friendliness of the waiters. Their “flamenquines” (slices of serrano ham wrapped in pork loin pieces, coated in breadcrumb and fried) are not to be missed, as well as their “salmorejo” (cold, creamy thick tomato soup) and Iberian ham, of course. Photo credit: Reload audiovisuales. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Getting there

It’s time to take your first tapas lunch in Seville, because you will probably be hungry after the boat ride and the visit. Walking for 13 minutes in the beautiful quarter of Santa Cruz, along Almirante Lobo Street and then turning left at Puerta de Jerez and walking along San Gregorio Street, you will reach Bodega Santa Cruz “Las Columnas”.

14:30 - 16:30
Cathedral of Seville
Av. de la Constitución, Sevilla, Spain
The Cathedral of Seville is one of the city’s most important architectural attractions. In fact, it has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Giralda is a tower that was built between the sixth and twelfth centuries, and for a long time it was the tallest building in the world. It’s probably the best-known symbol of Seville, together with the Torre del Oro, and from its top you can have a delightful view of the city. Next to it, the largest Gothic cathedral in the world is also worth visiting, of course, and where you can see Columbus’ remains. Finally, El Alcazar is one of the oldest palaces that are still in use in the world, and it has exceptionally beautiful architecture in several styles. Monday to Saturday: 10:45 am to 7:30 pm Sunday: 2:30 pm to 7:30 pm Photo credit: Jacob Díaz
Article By: Laura R. Godoy
Standard 10.00 EUR
Students 5.00 EUR
Kids 0.00 EUR Under 14
Seniors 5.00 EUR

Getting there

Our next stop is only 2 minutes away on foot along Mateos Gago street, and it’s easy to see it from far away: it’s the set of the Cathedral, the Giralda and the Alcazar.

17:00 - 18:00
Plaza de España
Av. Isabel la Católica, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
The Plaza de España was built in 1929 on occasion of the Ibero-American Expo and its peculiar shape (a semi-ellipsis) is meant to symbolize a hug from Spain to its former American territories. The dimensions of this plaza are impressive, and the canal that surrounds certainly adds to its beauty. Photo credit: Jacob Díaz
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Getting there

The Plaza de España (Spain Square) is another must-see in Seville and the distance from the Cathedral is not far. If you want to walk and enjoy the beauty of the district of Santa Cruz, you have to follow Avenida de la Constitución until Puerta de Jerez and then turn to Palos de la Frontera Street until you reach your destination. This will take around 18 minutes. The public transport option is not very beneficial because you would only gain 5 minutes.

18:00 - 19:00
María Luisa Park
Parque de María Luisa, P.º de las Delicias, s/n, 41013 Sevilla, Spain
The Park of María Luisa is one of the most beautiful parks in Spain, and its romantic air comes from the French engineer who designed it. If you come to Seville in summer, you will be very thankful for its shade. If spring is the time of your visit, you will enjoy the park at its very best. Photo credit: Manuel Ramallo. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Getting there

You don't need to travel to your next stop, because in fact you are already there!

19:30 - 21:00
Mirador San Fernando
C. San Fernando, 23, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Mirador San Fernando is a classic restaurant in Seville. You can eat outside and, now that Covid-19 seems to be more under control, you can also choose the nice room inside. You will be able to savour some of the typical Spanish dishes, such as beef cheek or delicious croquetas (croquettes). It’s not the cheapest restaurant in the area but it’s certainly one that offers value for money. Photo credit: Ralf Gervink. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Getting there

After walking the park, you will certainly be thinking of a place where you can sit, and take advantage of the treats of Sevillian gastronomy. If you leave the park through the gate that exits on Avenida de Portugal and take the Avenida del Cid you will arrive at the University. Apart from enjoying the sight of this beautiful building, the restaurant you are looking for is right there.

21:00 - 23:00
El palacio andaluz
C. Matemáticos Rey Pastor y Castro, 4, 41092 Sevilla, Spain
El palacio andaluz offers you a show that lasts for an hour and a half, and you can have a drink (or two, of course). The atmosphere of a live flamenco show is quite unique and, even if you are not really fond of this kind of dance and music, you will certainly enjoy this experience in the heart of flamenco. After the show you will be longing for bed and for some rest, which you will need for the following day in lively Seville! There are two shows, one at 7 pm and another at 9:30 pm. Photo credit: Chantal Giro. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy
Standard 39.00 EUR

Getting there

The day in Seville is not finished if you haven’t visited a tablao flamenco (the term “tablao” refers to the floorboard where flamenco shows are performed). It’s difficult to recommend one that isn’t touristy and at the same is not too “expert level” because then it can be a little overwhelming. One of them is located on the other bank of the river, so the best way to get there will probably be by taxi, because it’s too far to walk and the public transport takes too long as well. By taxi, you will be there in 13 minutes.

Day 2

10:00 - 12:00
Museum of fine arts
Pl. del Museo, 9, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
Originally a convent, this gallery is fundamental to know Sevillian Baroque painting, with incredible masters such as Murillo, Velázquez and Zurbarán. The museum is open 9 am to 9 pm from Monday to Saturday and Sundays from 9 am to 3 pm. Photo credit: Matthew Waring. Unsplash.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy
Standard 0.00 - 1.50 EUR

Getting there

A solid Spanish breakfast will give you strength to tackle the second day of the trip. You will start contemplating some art, at the Museum of fine arts, of course. You have several bus lines (03, 27, 32) and also L1 of the metro to get there easily.

12:00 - 12:30
Bullfighting ring of La Maestranza
P.º de Cristóbal Colón, 12, 41001 Sevilla, Spain
Even if you are against the practice of bullfighting, because of its cruelty, you can enjoy the sight of this ring as one of the most beautiful monuments in Seville. It was built in 1881 and its Baroque style is typical of Andalusia. La Maestranza is open for visitors evey day from 9:30 am to 7:30 pm. Photo credit: Laura Revuelta
Article By: Laura R. Godoy
Standard 10.00 EUR
Students 6.00 EUR
Kids 6.00 EUR Under 11

Getting there

Walking along Gravina Street for ten minutes you will be able to see a symbolic building, cherished by Sevillians: the bullfighting ring of La Maestranza.

13:00 - 15:00
Bar Triana
C. Castilla, 73, 41010 Sevilla, Spain
What can be more truly Sevillian than eating delicious tapas in a traditional bar in Triana? In Bar Triana, a real institution for the citizens of Seville, there are traditional tapas and dishes and also fresh, modern versions of some of them. However, you can’t leave the city without having a simple, delicious tapa of jamón (cured ham). This is one of the most savoury bites you can taste in Spanish cuisine, if it’s high-quality, of course. Together with a good wine from the land, and a slice of fresh, crunchy bread, you can simply be in paradise! Photo credit: Farhad Ibrahimzad. Unsplash.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Getting there

It’s high time to get to know the other bank of the Guadalquivir River, the iconic quarter of Triana. We are headed to our next gastronomic stop, Bar Triana. In order to go there we just have to cross the river through the Cristo de la Expiración River, and then turn left on Castilla Street.

15:00 - 16:30
Triana quarter
C. San Jorge, 6, 41010 Sevilla, Spain
The Triana quarter is a traditional quarter, where there are no impressive monuments but where charm can be found everywhere. From the market place to the banks of the river, not to mention Betis Street and the Capilla de los Marineros (Sailors’ Chapel), on Pureza Street. There you will be able to see a figure called the Virgin of the Hope of Triana, to whom the people from the quarter are devoted, in a beautiful Baroque altarpiece. The Plaza del Trocadero is the heart of the quarter, and there you will be able to sit and take some rest at an outdoor bar, before continuing the route. Photo credit: José Luis Martínez. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Notes

Triana is the symbol of creativity, art and freedom in Seville. Walking along its little streets it will not be uncommon to hear the sound of a guitar, or a flamenco “cante” or the tapping of flamenco dancers in some school of the neighbourhood. Several famous dancers, such as Antonio Canales or Remedios Amaya were born in Triana, and also famous singers such as Isabel Pantoja.

Getting there

After lunch, if you can resist the drowsiness, you just have to walk around Triana.

18:30 - 20:00
El Rinconcillo
C. Gerona, 40, 41003 Sevilla, Spain
El Rinconcillo (the little corner) dates back to 1670! Yes, it’s probably the oldest bar in Spain and maybe one of the oldest in Europe. Don’t worry, the food is fresh and you won’t see a ghost of one of the seventeenth century writers who are said to have eaten ham there. You will find traditional tapas, delicious cold meat and also homemade dishes such as clams a la marinière, codfish or pork cheeks. Photo credit: Pixel 1. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Getting there

The best way to come back to the other bank of the Guadalquivir is crossing the Isabel II Bridge, popularly known as the Triana Bridge. We are headed to the oldest bar in Seville, and to get there you can walk for 20 minutes along Reyes Católicos Street or, if you are tired and want to spare some strength for the rest of the evening, you can just take a taxi. Public transport will take longer that walking, incredible as it may seem!

20:00 - 22:00
Bar Garlochí
C. Boteros, 26, 41004 Sevilla, Spain
Bar Garlochí is a must in Seville because of its uniqueness. It was founded by the owner’s father and everything that you can see decorating the place has a story behind it. Beware if you don’t like sweet cocktails, because the bar's representative cocktail is overly sweet. The owner is friendly and loves talking to the customers, and this will contribute to making your drink here a complete Andalusian experience. After one or two cocktails at Garlochí, and some small talk in the Sevillian way, your visit to the capital will have captured you forever. So, your goodbye will become a see you later, Seville! Photo Credit: Pexels. Pixabay.com
Article By: Laura R. Godoy

Getting there

If you have energy left in you, the Sevillian night life will be waiting. After eating at a must such as El Rinconcillo, another “nightlife must” is awaiting in the corner. After a four-minute walk along Apodaca Street, there you are, in Boteros Street.

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About the author

I love languages and writing about the places I love - so that visitors can enjoy them as much as I do. I have been a freelance translator and content writer for some years now, and I hope to have helped many travellers with my tips!

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