A Weekend in Dublin

Travel Itinerary

0 ratings

Katie Baldwin
Itinerary by: Katie Baldwin
11 days ago
Travel Blogger
Duration: 2 days

For a small city, Dublin has so much heart. With its colorful streets, lively people, and history on every corner - there is so much to discover! This 2-day itinerary provides a whistle-stop tour of the city, immersing you in Dublin's downtown on Day 1, then walking you through a deeper understanding of its history on Day 2. As a whole, Dublin is an incredibly walkable city. You'll be able to reach most places on foot. The River Liffey splits the city into north and south sides, making the city easy to navigate. Depending on where you are staying in Dublin, or to reach some of the sites farther out, it is also easily navigable by bus or Luas tramline. You can purchase a "Leap" card at the beginning of your trip at most convenience stores and preload it with credit for the Luas or the bus. It's also possible to purchase Luas tickets at each stop or use exact change for the bus. An important tip - in Dublin, it is necessary to hail your bus! When you see it approaching, stick out your hand to alert the driver you'd like to get on. Also important to remember is that cars drive on the left side of the road in Ireland. When crossing the street, be sure to look to your right to ensure it's safe! While Dublin is very walkable, it does also get a bit wet due to Ireland's rainy climate. To stay dry during your visit, the best time of year is during the early summer months, such as May and June. That said, the climate of Ireland is mild, never getting too hot or too cold, making it a great place to travel year-round. In early winter, Dublin is also lit up in its Christmas best and makes for a lovely time to explore. Regardless of when you arrive, you'll want to make sure you have clothing for every type of weather. In Dublin, it's possible to experience it all in one day! If you do encounter some rain, why not take advantage of one of the city's many cozy pubs or cafes. Duck in for a packet of crisps, perhaps a cheeky pint, and a chat. Each place has such character and will give you a taste of life in Dublin. To pay, the currency in Ireland is the Euro. Most places you visit will accept major credit cards. However, it can be helpful to have some cash on hand for small places, tips, and a few coins for the bus. When tipping, it is customary to leave about 10-15% of the bill at restaurants. When chatting with locals, people will be speaking in English. However, Ireland has two official languages - English and Irish! When traveling on the bus or Luas line, you'll hear all the stops be recited in both languages. By the end of your stay in Dublin, you'll hopefully have had some wonderful experiences, be leaving with a greater appreciation for this fair city, and likely have had some good 'craic' along the way! Image Credit: Darby1996 on Pixabay, Luizagalsc on Pixabay, Anna Church on Unsplash

Day 1

Get to Know Downtown Dublin

All the locations on your first day of exploring are located in Dublin's city center. You'll be able to reach each of them on foot, enabling you to get a feel for the city. It also leaves some wiggle room for any places that catch your eye!
10:00 - 10:30
St. Stephen's Green
St Stephen's Green, Dublin, Ireland
To kick off your weekend in Dublin, the best place to start is St. Stephen's Green in the heart of the city center. Easily accessible by bus or Luas tram line, the Green is a great landmark from which you can begin your exploring. If you're lucky enough to have good weather, you can stroll this historic park and its lovely gardens with your morning coffee and pastry. Walking through the Green, you can read various plaques about its connection with the Guinness family and its involvement during the 1916 Easter Rising - including the ceasefire so the groundsman could feed the park's ducks! From Stephen's Green, you can then meander down Grafton Street, Dublin's main pedestrian thoroughfare. Off Grafton street, you'll find all manner of shops, pubs, cafes, and restaurants you may wish to return to during your trip. At the bottom of Grafton Street is your next stop, Trinity College. Photo by Molly Blackbird on Unsplash and Picography on Pixabay
Article By: Katie Baldwin

10:30 - 11:30
Trinity College Old Library & Book of Kells
Old Library, College Green, South-East Inner City, Dublin 2, D02 VR66, Ireland
It may be a surprise to learn one of the most frequently visited places in Dublin is a library! Housed in the prestigious Trinity College, the Old Library dates back to the 18th century and is one of the most beautiful libraries in the world. For Star Wars fans, it may already look familiar as the Long Room of the library was the inspiration behind the Jedi Library! Inside, you'll find not only incredible architecture and over 20,000 of the library's oldest books, but also the medieval harp used as the symbol of Ireland (and Guinness!), and an original Proclamation of the Irish Republic read during the 1916 Easter Rising. In addition to the Long Room of the library, your entry ticket also grants access to view the famed Book of Kells. Dating back to the 9th century, this gospel manuscript exhibits some of the most detailed, intricate, and extravagant illustrations of all surviving gospel manuscripts. The Long Room and Book of Kells are open 7 days a week. Tickets can be purchased online. As the Library is such a popular Dublin attraction, it is best to book tickets in advance. Tickets can be purchased solely to view the library and Book of Kells or you can take a full tour of Trinity Campus which includes entry to both exhibits. Allow for 30-40 minutes in the library to view the Long Room and Book of Kells. Image Credit: Alboomen on Pixabay, Tomáš Nožina on Unsplash, Gigglekid on Pixabay
Article By: Katie Baldwin
Standard 18.00 EUR
Group 14.00 EUR
Students 15.00 EUR
Seniors 15.00 EUR

Getting there

From Saint Stephen's Green (Shopping Center), it is a 7-minute walk down Grafton Street to Trinity College.

Travel time
0 hours 7 minutes
11:40 - 12:30
National Archaeology Museum of Ireland
2 Kildare St, Dublin, Ireland
The history of Ireland is a long and fascinating one, from Neolithic civilizations to the Vikings of Dublin, there is so much to learn! Get an up-close look by exploring the National Archaeology Museum of Ireland. Of all the exhibits, the most fascinating is likely "Kingship and Sacrifice". On display are remarkably preserved bodies, discovered in several of Ireland's bogs, that date all the way back to the Iron Age! The exhibit explains the theory that they may have been victims of human sacrifice and tells a tale of Ireland's sovereignty and kingship rituals in 400 to 200 BC. Each of Ireland's national museums are free to the public, so you can spend as little or as much time as you like exploring. Allow anywhere from 20 minutes to 1 hour in the museum. Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Article By: Katie Baldwin
Standard Free

Notes

From the National Archaeology Museum, the National Gallery of Ireland is just around the corner, a further 4 minutes of walking. If this is of interest, the Gallery is free to enter and houses Ireland's collection of Irish and European art.

Getting there

Depart Trinity College through the Nassau Street entrance/exit and walk approx 5-minutes over to the National Archaeology Museum.

Travel time
0 hours 5 minutes
13:00 - 13:05
Molly Malone Statue
Suffolk St, Dublin 2, D02 KX03, Ireland
While you're in Dublin, it's tradition to pay a visit to one of the city's most famous residents - the statue of Molly Malone. Although a fictional character, the song "Molly Malone" (also known as "Cockles and Mussels" or "In Dublin's Fair City) is believed to be Dublin's unofficial anthem. If stopping at a pub later in the day, you can raise a glass to ol' Molly and sing a few bars - “In Dublin’s fair city, where the girls are so pretty, I first laid my eyes on sweet Molly Malone”! Image Credit: Ugglemama on Pixabay
Article By: Katie Baldwin

Getting there

An 8-minute walk back down Nassau Street towards Suffolk Street.

Travel time
0 hours 8 minutes
13:15 - 13:30
George's Street Arcade
South Great George's Street, Dublin, Ireland
While George's Street Arcade may not contain any pinball machines, it does contain some wonderfully quirky shopping stalls, record shops, food vendors, and history. The arcade was Ireland's first purpose-built shopping centre, built in 1881. Its beautiful Victorian architecture makes for a picturesque place to pick up a few souvenirs or trinkets to remember your time in Dublin. The arcade also happens to be located in the heart of Dublin's downtown, with shops, restaurants, and coffee shops galore. Why not grab a coffee in Kaph, wander into Fallon & Byrne (Dublin's swankiest grocery store), or perhaps, duck into the nearby Long Hall Pub, one of the city's most famous watering holes. You'll get a real feel for the colorful, buzzy nature of Dublin's downtown as you walk around! Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons
Article By: Katie Baldwin

Notes

Looking for a bite to eat? Head into Powerscourt Townhouse Centre, a historic Georgian townhouse home to both delightful lunch spots, such as the Pepper Pot, and unique shops. You are also near to Grogan's Pub, where you can get one of the best pints of Guinness in Dublin, paired nicely with a ham & cheese toastie (grilled ham & cheese to Americans!).

Getting there

A 4-minute walk down South William Street to enter George's Street Arcade.

Travel time
0 hours 4 minutes
15:00 - 15:30
Dublin Castle
2 Dame St, Dublin, Ireland
As you meander through the city center, it is worth popping in to view Dublin's very own castle. The site of Dublin Castle was first a Viking settlement and then the headquarters of English and Irish administration for centuries. Located within the castle grounds is the Black Pool - 'Dubh Linn' in Irish - which gave Dublin its name! Tickets to tour the castle are free and can be booked seven days a week. Alternatively, why not take a seat in the castle gardens with a coffee or sandwich and enjoy some Irish sunshine. If you don't have the weather, the Chester Beatty Library is a fascinating museum, also located in the castle grounds, with an incredible cafe & restaurant. Image Credit: Pagagnoc on Pixabay
Article By: Katie Baldwin

Getting there

From George's Street, Dublin Castle is an 8-minute walk across Dame Street.

Travel time
0 hours 8 minutes
15:35 - 17:35
Temple Bar
Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland
On your whistle-stop tour of Dublin, you may want to wet your whistle with a few pints in Temple Bar. This neighborhood in downtown Dublin is the epicenter of the city's nightlife and good 'craic' - the Irish for fun! While the bars, pubs, and restaurants in this area are more touristy (and more expensive), it's also where you'll find live Irish folk music, unique shops, and an all-around good time. Grab a picture outside The Temple Bar Pub and toast to a great day in Dublin! Image Credit: Diogo Palhais on Unsplash
Article By: Katie Baldwin

Notes

Looking for a less touristy place to hear live music? Head across the River Liffey to Smithfield where you'll find The Cobblestone Pub and traditional Irish music played 7 days a week!

Getting there

From Dublin Castle, cross Dame Street again and walk into the Temple Bar neighborhood, a 4-minute walk.

Travel time
0 hours 4 minutes

Day 2

Discover Dublin's History

On your second day in Dublin, you'll head outside the city center to learn more about the city's unique history and culture.
10:00 - 10:30
General Post Office
O'Connell Street Lower, North City, Dublin 1, Ireland
One of Dublin's hidden gems is the General Post Office on O'Connell Street. A grand, Georgian building in itself, it was also the headquarters for the rebel leaders during the 1916 Easter Rising! Walk by to marvel at the architecture (and look for the bullet holes still visible in its columns!) or step inside to the GPO Museum: Witness History Exhibit. The exhibit is an interactive, immersive experience around the 1916 Easter Rising and Modern Irish History. You'll gain a greater understanding of both of the events of the Rising as well as how the city of Dublin has changed throughout the years. The museum is open Wednesday to Saturday from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, in July, August & September from Tuesday to Saturday, 10:00 am to 5:00 pm. The last admission is at 4:00 pm. Tickets are available online and best purchased in advance. Image Credit: Mark Lawson on Unsplash
Article By: Katie Baldwin
Standard 13.50 EUR
Students 10.50 EUR
Seniors 10.50 EUR

11:00 - 11:30
Ha'penny Bridge
Ha'penny Bridge, Bachelors Walk, Temple Bar, Dublin, Ireland
On your jaunt through town, you'll want to take a moment to grab a photo on this iconic bridge. Built in 1816, it used to cost half a penny to reach the other side of the River Liffey - giving this bridge its name! Image Credit: Ugglemama on Pixabay
Article By: Katie Baldwin

Getting there

From the GPO, it is a 6-minute walk down O'Connell Street and along the River Liffey to the Ha'penny Bridge.

Travel time
0 hours 6 minutes
11:30 - 12:30
Saint Patrick's Cathedral
St Patrick's Close, Dublin 8, A96 P599, Ireland
The next site on your tour of Dublin is one that, in Ireland, speaks for itself - Saint Patrick's Cathedral. As legend has it, the site of the Cathedral is where Saint Patrick stopped on his journey through Ireland to baptize people from a nearby well in the 5th century. Now, it is the national cathedral for the Church of Ireland and a pilgrimage site for people from around the world. There is a small fee to enter which can be purchased online or on the day of your visit. Take a look at the calendar on the Cathedral's website for special events, such as evening choirs or services, you may wish to experience. Additionally, the Cathedral is also home to a lovely park with a small outdoor cafe where you can join the locals in soaking up any good weather. If the weather isn't on your side, duck into Marsh’s Library just around the corner. This library is three hundred years old and completely unchanged. It was where Bram Stoker studied and Jonathan Swift used to read! Image Credit: William Murphy on Flickr
Article By: Katie Baldwin
Standard 8.00 EUR
Students 7.00 EUR
Kids 0.00 EUR Under 3
Seniors 6.50 EUR

Notes

If you are traveling on foot from the Ha'penny Bridge to Saint Patrick's Cathedral, you will be passing by Christ Church Cathedral as well. This is the oldest medieval cathedral in Dublin and may look familiar to fans of the show The Tudors as it provided the setting!

Getting there

From the Ha'penny bridge, it is a 17-minute walk to reach Saint Patrick's Cathedral. It is also possible to hop on a bus from Dame Street (route #'s 27, 77A, 150, 151) to Kevin Street, a 3-minute walk from the Cathedral (15 minutes total travel time).

Travel time
0 hours 17 minutes
13:00 - 13:30
Guinness Storehouse
53 James’s Street St James’s Gate, Saint James' (part of Phoenix Park), Dublin 8, Ireland
It's finally time! After your pilgrimage to Saint Patrick's Cathedral, make your pilgrimage to the famed Guinness Brewery. Dive into the story of Guinness: its history, how it's made, marketed, and even how to pour it, all while exploring seven floors of this iconic building. Your journey through the halls of Guinness will finish on the top floor, the Gravity Bar, which has 360 views of Dublin - worth the price of admission alone! Your ticket will include entry to the Storehouse experience as well as a free pint of Guinness or soft drink. A tip, purchase your ticket online in advance as prices tend to be cheaper online. Allow for at least 90 minutes to see everything on this extensive tour and to enjoy your pint at the Gravity Bar. Opening hours are Sunday to Thursday: 10am-5pm (last entry 4pm), Friday and Saturday: 10am-7pm (last entry 6pm). Not a fan of "the black stuff"? If whiskey is more up your alley, perhaps head to nearby Teelings Distillery, the first new distillery to open in Dublin in 125 years. Or, cross the River Liffey to reach the popular Jameson Distillery. Image Credit: Ana Ribeiro on Unsplash, Andrew Meßner on Unsplash
Article By: Katie Baldwin
Standard 22.00 EUR
Kids 10.00 EUR Under 17

Getting there

From Saint Patrick's Cathedral, it is another 17-minute walk to Guinness Storehouse. Alternatively, it is possible to walk back down towards the River Liffey and Christ Church Cathedral to hop on a bus from High Street (route #123) to Steeven's Lane, a 5-minute walk from Guinness (an 18-minute journey in total). If you prefer to hop in a taxi (the FreeNow app is similar to Uber), it is an 8-10 minute drive.

Travel time
0 hours 18 minutes
14:00 - 15:00
Kilmainham Gaol
The Belfry, Inchicore Rd, Inchicore, Dublin 8, Ireland
Kilmainham Gaol, Dublin's former prison, may have closed its doors in 1924, but it remains a fascinating and critical piece of history. Throughout Ireland's struggle for independence, leaders of its rebel movements, including the 1916 Rising, were imprisoned and even executed here. Today, the jail stands as an important symbol in the story of Irish nationalism and a reminder of the lives lost along the way. However, thousands of ordinary people were also held in Kilmainham for their crimes - ranging from petty theft to murder. The conditions by which men, women, and even children were kept while imprisoned provides a unique look at another perspective of life in 18th century Dublin. The jail is open for visitors seven days a week, year-round with opening/closing times varying slightly by month. This is a very popular attraction in Dublin so it is highly recommended to book in advance online. Allow about 90 minutes for the complete tour of the building. Image Credit: NakNakNak on Pixabay
Article By: Katie Baldwin
Standard 8.00 EUR
Students 4.00 EUR
Kids 4.00 EUR Under 18
Seniors 6.00 EUR

Notes

After your tour of Kilmainham Gaol, you have hit all the major tourist attractions in Dublin! From Kilmainham, it is possible to return to where you began your day, on O'Connell Street, by walking about 10 minutes up to the Suir Road Luas Stop (Red Line). From there, you can hop on the Luas back to Dublin city center, about 15 minutes to the Abbey Street stop, just off O'Connell Street. With the rest of your time in Dublin, why not soak up more of the city by indulging in some good food or picking up a few souvenirs to remind you of your time in Dublin's fair city.

Getting there

If you traveled by bus to the Guinness Storehouse, return to the Steeven's Lane bus stop and hop on the #13 towards Grange Castle, getting off at Inchicore Library. From there, it is a 5-minute walk to Kilmainham Gaol (15-minute total journey). Alternatively, it is possible to walk to Kilmainham Gaol from Guinness in approx 22 minutes. In a taxi, it is an 8-10 minute drive.

Travel time
0 hours 20 minutes
Privacy: public
About the author

An energetic, travel enthusiast striving to be Samantha Brown's new best friend and determined to sample every variety of mac and cheese encountered! Known for getting you a little lost - and making sure it was worth it.

Sign in and get started

  • Contribute to the community
  • Enable likes, reviews and bookmarks
  • Follow your favorite contributors
  • Promote your business

Related itineraries

Recommended itineraries

Sofia Abrantes
a month ago
Lily Crossley-Baxter
2 months ago
Zoran Trifunovic
3 months ago
Vicente Quintero
a month ago
Laura R. Godoy
a month ago
Freya Godfrey
24 days ago
Alex Dryjowicz
15 days ago
Rose Winter
15 days ago
Pavel Revenkov
11 days ago
Katie Baldwin
11 days ago
Madeleine Nicholson
2 days ago
Dan Hill
2 months ago
Dan Hill
25 days ago
Dan Hill
a year ago
Scott McGlynn
a year ago
Scott McGlynn
a year ago
Lily Crossley-Baxter
a year ago
Dan Hill
25 days ago
Matt Lynch
10 months ago
Pavneet Lobana
3 months ago
Haz Mapz
3 months ago
Design Your Italy
3 months ago
Rebecca Cetta
9 days ago
Anne Renaux
a month ago
Gonçalo Costa
a month ago
Kerri Somers
9 days ago
Oksana Petersen
9 days ago
© 2021 Peak Cadence ApS | About | Promote Your Business | Twitter | YouTube | LinkedIn | Privacy Policy | Terms and Conditions