3 Days in Kyoto

Travel Itinerary

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Itinerary by: Lily Crossley-Baxter
2 months ago
Travel Writer
Culture-Bridge Culture-Castle Culture-Shrine Culture-Temple Diverse-Market Nature-Forest Nature-River Settlement-Neighbourhood
Duration: 3 days

The ancient capital of Japan, Kyoto is filled with temples, shrines and winding streets just waiting to be explored. While it is mainly known for two of the most famous spots in Japan - the gold pavilion of Kinkakuji and the red torii gates of Fushimi Inari Taisha - there are incredible food markets, blossom-covered waterways and zen gardens to enjoy. The city has 17 UNESCO World Heritage sites and over 2000 temples and shrines, so choosing what to see can feel a little overwhelming. This three-day itinerary mixes some of the most popular places with their lesser-known neighbours to give you a deeper understanding of the culture, history and everyday life of Kyoto. Kyoto has some great options when it comes to transport, with an affordable bus loop, bike-rental and a metro and train network to boot. When you’re exploring the West side, the bus may suit best, and trains and metro stations are more practical for the East, with walking in-between. You can purchase a ¥500 one-day bus ticket at Kyoto station and the city has a flat-rate bus fare of ¥230, so the pass soon becomes worthwhile. There are a number of bike-rental options ranging from hostels and hotels to specialist companies, and the grid-like layout of the city means it is easy to explore on wheels.

Day 1

Gold leaf, Bamboo and Boats

Day one takes you West, from the golden Kinkakuji to the swaying bamboo forests of Arashiyama. Relying mainly on buses, this day also requires some train travel and of course, a fair bit of walking - but with all these sites to see you won’t even notice!
09:00 - 10:00
Kinkakuji
1 Kinkakujichō, Kita-ku, Kyoto, 603-8361, Japan
Appearing on the cover of almost every guidebook to Japan, the glimmering gold pagoda of Kinkakuji is a must-see spot (and yes, it is better in person). This means it gets more than a little busy, so making it your first stop is a good idea if you’re keen to have a little more space. Now a UNESCO World Heritage site, the gold-leaf covered temple is backed by the Kitayama mountains, the North-west of the city. A grand pavilion surrounded by gardens, the grounds were once home to a statesman’s villa, before Yoshimitsu, an Ashikaga shogun transformed the site into a heaven-like garden surrounding the central pavilion. Following his death in 1408, it became a Zen Temple under the Rinza sect of Buddhism and has the official name of Rokuon-ji. Famously, the temple was burned down in 1950 by a young monk and the current structure was rebuilt over the following five years. Today, visitors can follow a designated path through the grounds with multiple viewing points across the pond and from the garden. There is a teahouse offering matcha and wagashi (small sweets to accompany tea) which is particularly lovely in winter. There are also small gift shops and a shrine in the grounds. Note that you cannot return along the path, so be sure to take your time as you go. Hours: 9am - 5pm, no regular closed days. [Images: 1. JordyMeow/Pixabay, 2. LCB, 3.LCB]
Culture-Temple
Standard 400.00 JPY
Kids 300.00 JPY Under 15

Getting there

Kinkakuji is best reached by bus, with a few direct routes from Kyoto station. There are clear signposts at the bus stops and guides to help - look out for numbers 101 and 205. The journey takes about 45 minutes and costs the flat-rate of 230 yen.

Travel time
0 hours 45 minutes
10:00 - 11:00
Ryoanji
13 Ryōanji Goryōnoshitachō, Ukyo Ward, Kyoto, 616-8001, Japan
A place of contemplation, Ryoanji may be close to the crowded paths of the golden pavilion, but it feels a thousand miles away when it comes to atmosphere. Established by Hosokawa Katsumoto in 1450, the temple was originally a mountain villa but the shogun deputy invited Zen priest Giten Gensho to reside there. Suffering numerous fires, the complex has been rebuilt over centuries but maintains a sense of calm throughout its grounds. The most famous and intriguing element is the stone garden, a UNESCO World Heritage site located beside the main building. The history of the garden is shrouded in mystery, with little known about its creator - although Hosokawa, Giten, famed painter Soami are all considered possible designers. The abstract layout of the 15 stones lends to the curiosity surrounding it - with many interpretations offered, from a tiger carrying her cubs to mountains in the clouds. Taking a seat on the worn wooden steps of the Hojo (the abbot’s hall), visitors can contemplate the garden’s possibilities and perspectives - taking a break from the hectic nature of everyday life, if only for a while. The neighbouring temple of Ninnaji is nearby and has an impressive Japanese garden and Pagoda, accessible by bus or on foot from Ryoanji. Hours: Mar - Nov: 8am - 5pm, Dec - Feb: 8.30am - 4.30pm. [Images: All LCB]
Culture-Temple
Standard 499.99 JPY
Kids 300.00 JPY Under 15

Getting there

Ryoanji is a short bus ride from Kinkakuji with bus stops beside both locations. The journey is covered on the 500 yen bus pass or costs the flat rate of 230 yen without one - alight at Ryoanji bus stop. If you are traveling directly from Kyoto station you can catch the number 50 bus to Ritsumeikan Daigaku-mae station which is a 5-7 minute walk from the temple. There is also the Ryoanji stop on the Keifuku Kitano railway line which is also a 5-7 minute walk away.

Travel time
0 hours 20 minutes
11:00 - 13:00
Tenryuji
Japan, 〒616-8385 京都府京都市右京区嵯峨天龍寺芒ノ馬場町68
The most important temple in Arashiyama, Tenryuji is known for its beautiful landscape gardens and as another UNESCO World Heritage site. The temple was originally built to appease the spirit of an Emperor in 1339 and while numerous buildings have been lost in fires over the centuries, the garden has remained intact. Designed by the renowned Muso Soseki, the Sogenchi garden centers on a rock-surrounded pond and employs the stunning mountains as a scenic backdrop - a prime example of shakkei (borrowed scenery) design. A strolling pond garden, it has been a popular spot for visitors since the late 18th century and was included in a guide to traditional gardens published in 1799. The majority of the current buildings were rebuilt in the Meiji period, but are still fascinating to explore. The Hojo is the large main hall and can be visited for an additional fee, while the Hatto (Dharma Hall) is home to the impressive Cloud Dragon painting on the ceiling. The Hatto is only open on weekends and holidays and during special seasonal dates. Within the Ryumontei (Dragon Gate Pavilion) is the temple’s vegetarian restaurant, Shigetsu. Here, visitors can try traditional Buddhist cuisine known as shojin ryori which is a restrained, seasonal selection served as a multi-dish course. Entry: Gardens are 500 yen (adults), 300 yen (junior high and below) Entry to the temple grounds is an additional 300 yen. Entry to the Dharma Hall is an additional 500 yen. Hours: 8.30am - 5pm (last entry 4.50pm) [Images: 1. Dongjakumin/Pixabay 2. LCB
Culture-Temple
Standard 500.00 JPY Plus fee
Kids 300.00 JPY Under 15 Plus fee

Getting there

If you are travelling from Ryoanji or Ninnaji, simply walk down to the nearest Randen station to catch the local tram to Katabiranotsuji Station and switch to the Arashiyama Line - it should take approximately 20 minutes and you’ll then be a five minute walk from the temple. If arriving from elsewhere, the temple is a 5-15 minute walk from the different train stations in Arashiyama, you can catch the Hankyu or Sagano Lines or take bus numbers 61, 72 or 83 from Kyoto.

Travel time
0 hours 30 minutes
13:00 - 15:00
Sagano Bamboo Forest and Nonomiya Shrine
Japan, 〒616-8385 京都府京都市右京区嵯峨天龍寺芒ノ馬場町68
The swaying stalks of the Sagano Bamboo grove are right on Tenryuji’s doorstep. While the green-lined paths may be filled with people, the impressive grove is still a sight to behold, but arrive early if you’re looking for serenity. The area is free to explore, with small temples and shrines dotted throughout. One of the highlights is Nonomiya shrine, once a sacred house for Shinto Priestesses. Mentioned in the famous 11th century novel the Tale of Genji, it was a site for purification and is now popular with women seeking love, strong matrimony and fortune in childbearing. The small grounds host a series of beautiful ema boards (plaques for wishes), a main altar and a series of smaller shrines surrounded by a simple moss garden. You can purchase a good luck charm and make a wish at the turtle rock - it promises to grant a wish in a year. The unusual black tori gate which marks the entrance recreates the ancient style of the shrine’s past and welcomes guests throughout the year. There is also an option to walk to Otagi Nenbutsuji, a temple with over 100 unique carved statues. It is a 40-minute walk but you can visit Jojakuko, Nison-in and Gio temples along the way as well as the Saga Toriimoto preserved street. It will also be much quieter than other areas as few make this extra journey! Hours: 9am - 5pm (Nonomiya) [Images: 1. Shingo_No/Pixabay, 2. LCB, 3. LCB]
Culture-Shrine Nature-Forest

Getting there

Sagano Bamboo Forest is right beside Tenryuji and Nonomiya Shrine is within the forest.

Travel time
0 hours 2 minutes
15:00 - 17:00
Togetsukyo Bridge
Japan, 〒616-8385 京都府京都市右京区嵯峨天龍寺芒ノ馬場町68
A symbol of Arashiyama, the ‘moon crossing’ bridge has crossed the Katsura river for over 400 years. Whether crossed to reach work every morning, used for famous film scenes or simply to enjoy the views, the bridge is the heart of the town. Restaurants, cafes and shops fill the nearby streets while boats are available to rent in the waters beneath it. During the spring blossoms and autumn leaves the area is particularly beautiful, with the wooden bridge offering an unchanged view from centuries gone by. There are options to rent rowboats and explore the water or take a scenic river boat. During the warmer months many will take drinks and snacks from the nearby stores to enjoy by the water’s edge, resting weary feet in the cooling water. [Images: 1. azu_yamamoto/Pixabay, 2. LCB, 3. LCB)
Culture-Bridge

Getting there

The bridge is in the heart of the town,and just a few minutes walk from the bamboo grove. If travelling from Kyoto station, it is best reached on the Sanin Line, which takes 15 minutes with a short walk to the bridge on arrival.

Travel time
0 hours 5 minutes
Day 2

Markets and Mountains

Focusing on the center of Kyoto, day two introduces you to some of Kyoto’s most delicious snacks and most captivating sights.
10:00 - 12:00
Nijo Castle
Nijojocho, Nakagyo Ward, Kyoto, 604-8301, Japan
Home to the first Shogun of the Edo period, Tokugawa Ieyasu, Nijo Castle is a central part of Kyoto’s history. Completed and further developed by his son, the castle remained until the fall of Edo in 1867 when it became an imperial palace. Shortly after, the palace was donated to the people and has been open to visitors ever since - with preserved buildings, moats and impressive gardens. As a UNESCO World Heritage site, the remaining grounds are considered some of the best examples of feudal design left standing in Japan. Having crossed the wide moat, visitors can explore three areas - the main circle (Honmaru), the inner circle (Ninomaru) and the gardens. One of the highlights is the Ninomaru Palace which has survived in its original form. The famous Nightingale floors altered soldiers to intruders while elegant screens and painted ceilings can be admired if you decide to enter (at an additional cost). The Ninomaru Garden is a traditional landscape garden and the wider grounds are well known for their cherry blossom in spring. The Honmaru grounds are not usually open to the public, but are home to a transported residence known as the Honmaru Palace. Visitors can, however, climb the former castle keep to view the grounds almost in their entirety. There are audio-tours available to rent and in-person tours are available twice a day (you can reserve a space online). Hours: Oct - Jun: 8.45am - 5pm Jul - Aug: 8am - 6pm Sept: 8am - 5pm The Ninomaru is closed on Tuesdays in Jan, Jul, Aug and Dec. [Images: 1. qtyqy2250/Pixabay, 2. Conchin Ortiz/Pixabay, 3. Meng Yu/Pixabay]
Culture-Castle
Standard 620.00 JPY Plus fee
Group 520.00 JPY

Getting there

The castle is 10 minutes from Kyoto Station on the Karasuma Line, alighting at Marutamachi Station.

Travel time
0 hours 10 minutes
12:00 - 14:00
Nishiki Market
Nijojocho, Nakagyo Ward, Kyoto, 604-8301, Japan
From wooden casks of pickled veg to skewered squid, Nishiki market is a food-lover’s dream. A step back into a nostalgia-filled Japan, the bustling market stalls are a distant cry from the sleek high-end stores that line the nearby Shijo Street. Feeding locals and visitors alike for over 400 years, the market has over 100 stalls to choose from, offering snacks, seafood and great souvenirs all in one place. Focused on local, high-quality produce, the stalls are often family run, with many trading for generations. You can sample quality teas from nearby Uji, try tsukemono (pickled vegetables) from the prefecture or opt for a sweet treat like mochi or sesame balls. There are plenty of cafes to choose from if you need a break, including an official Snoopy cafe. For souvenirs, consider getting some nifty packs of furikake - seasoning you sprinkle on rice to fit into your no-doubt fast-filling suitcase. If you’re after non-food items, be sure to check out Aritsugu knives - they have been perfecting their art since 1560 and are currently run by the family’s 18th generation. The knives aren’t cheap, but they are some of the highest quality in the world, so you’ll have them for life. For something a little lighter on the wallet, you’ll find chopsticks galore with options for personalisation as well as small hashioki to rest them on. The market is also home to Nishiki Tenmangu Shrine and a wider network of shops and restaurants, so be sure you’ve set enough time aside to really explore, as well as grabbing lunch. Hours: Approximately 9am - 5pm, store dependent. [Images: 1. LCB, 2. LCB, 3. LCB]
Diverse-Market

Getting there

Nishiki Market is in central Kyoto, around a 20-minute walk from Nijo Castle. Alternatively you can catch the Karasuma line from Imadegawa or Marutamachi Stations to Shijo Station, which is a few minutes from the market. Nishiki is a twenty minute walk from Kyoto Station, with frequent buses to Shijo street and the Karasuma Line to Shijo Station.

Travel time
0 hours 20 minutes
14:00 - 16:00
Tofukuji
15-chōme-778 Honmachi, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto, 605-0981, Japan
One of the lesser-visited but undeniably impressive structures of Kyoto, Tofokuji is one of the city’s five great zen temples. Built by the great statesman of the Kamakura period, Kujo Michiie in 1236, it was given a character from each of Nara’s main temple to form Tofokuji. Although the buildings were lost in a series of fires, some compounds have survived and others have been painstakingly refurbished to recreate the grand presence of the past. Possibly its most striking feature is the towering Sanmon Gate, which is a national treasure and stands tall at 22m tall. Although it burned down in 1336, it has since survived, undergoing an intensive restructure and repair effort lasting almost 9 years in the 1970s. It is now the oldest Zen main gate in Japan, and offers a daunting welcome to those visiting. The biggest draw in Autumn, however, is the Kaisando bridge, surrounded by the deep hues of fall leaves and visited by thousands. The temple has four gardens to explore - the rock gardens to the south, the moss and azalea gardens to the west, the chequered moss garden to the north and the cylindrical stone garden to the east. Hours: 9am - 4pm [Images: 1. Sharon Ang/Pixabay, 2. Sharon Ang/Pixabay
Culture-Temple

Getting there

Tofukuji is a short bus ride from Nishiki Market with numbers 208 and 5 among the options. Alternatively, you can catch the Nara Line from Kyoto Station to Tofukuji Station.

Travel time
0 hours 15 minutes
16:00 - 18:00
Fushimi Inari Taisha
68 Fukakusa Yabunouchichō, Fushimi Ward, Kyoto, 612-0882, Japan
Another of the great symbols of Kyoto, the trailing red torii gates of Fushimi Inari Taisha are not to be missed. While the crowds at the lower levels can be a bit much, the further up the mountain you go, the fewer people you’ll see, so putting some more time aside to explore will really pay off. The scale of the temple may surprise you as there’s more to it than a few gates - the shrine precinct holds the main complex and the entirety of the 233m tall Mt. Inari. At the foot of the site visitors are welcomed by the 16th century Romon Gate and the main shrine building which is actually home to five individual shrines. Along with the lower, middle and upper shrines are Tanaka and Shino Okami auxiliary shrines. The enshrined deity Inari is the god of rice, with a modern connection to business and prosperity - which explains the number of gates. During the Edo period it became common for torii gates to be used as offerings to deities in hope of good fortune. When you pass through the trails take a look at the names written on the backs of each gate - these are the businesses or people who donated to the shrine. There are bright maps showing the gate-covered mountain routes, and the famous forked path you’ll no doubt have seen is found early on. Beyond this, you can continue to the Yotsusuji Intersection with city views. After this the trails will be even quieter, with smaller shrines and a more dilapidated feel until you reach the top (no views here though). Personally I really enjoy the trip to the top, but be sure to head down before it gets dark - the paths are uneven and can become slippery. The food stalls and restaurants at the base of the shrine are a great spot to try the local specialities of inari-sushi (rice in a sweet tofu-skin) or Kitsune Udon (noodles with deep-fried tofu). The fried tofu, known as aburage is considered a favourite of the foxes who are Inari’s messengers, easily spotted in statue form at shrines across Japan. [Images: 1. Wise Traveler/Pixabay, 2. LCB, 3. LCB, 4. LCB]
Culture-Temple

Getting there

Walk 10 minutes to Tofukuji Station and catch the Nara Line to Inari Station - it takes around 10 minutes.

Travel time
0 hours 20 minutes
Day 3

Strolling East

Day three is a day of exploring - from the meditative routes of Philosophers to the ancient streets of Higashiyama. It rounds off with some of the best views of Kyoto, as well as a chance to find love - if you're lucky.
09:00 - 11:00
Ginkakuji
2 Ginkakujichō, Sakyō-ku, Kyoto, 606-8402, Japan
The lesser-known cousin of the golden Kinkakuji, this unassuming but beautiful temple is a symbol of Kyoto’s refined past. Originally the Higashiyama Palace of Shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa, it became a Zen temple under the Rinzai school following his death at the end of the 15th century. A keen pursuer of aesthetic beauty, Yoshimasa sought help from a number of Zen monks in the design and included inspiration from Kinkakuji (his grandfather’s villa) as well as Saihoji, also known as the moss temple. The temple’s garden is the only surviving example overseen by Yoshimasa’s, although famous Noh actor Zeami was responsible for most of the layout. An art lover, Yoshimasa was a cultural leader in his era and Ginkakuji became a hub of creativity, nicknamed Higashiyama Culture. This style was considered contemporary and impacted the arts nationwide, including tea ceremony, theater, ikebana and architecture. Evidence of this can be seen in the gardens, building design and decoration - although the interiors are not open to the public apart from special opening times in spring and autumn. The gardens, however, can be explored using trailing paths, with stunning views at every turn. The sand garden, called the Sea of Silver Sand, is home to the moon viewing platform - a perfectly sculpted cone arising from neatly raked rows. The moss garden has a wilder forest-like element while the pond offers a beautiful reflection of the villa. Considered an example of wabi-sabi in contrast to the golden inspiration, Ginkakuji was never silver, but is believed to have a silver tint to the thatched roof when hit by moonlight. Hours: Mar - Nov: 8.30am - 5pm, Dec - Feb: 9am - 4.30pm
Culture-Temple
Standard 500.00 JPY
Kids 300.00 JPY Under 15

Getting there

Ginkakuji is close to Ginkakuji Bus Stop and can be reached on bus numbers 5, 17, 32, 100, 102, 203 and 204. The nearest station, Mototanaka, is a 30 minute walk away.

10:00 - 12:00
Philosopher’s Path
Shishigatani Honenin Nishimachi, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto, 606-8427, Japan
A beautiful stroll along one of Kyoto’s quiet canalside paths, this route begins close to the Ginkakuji and ends close to Nanzenji. Lined with cherry blossom in spring, it is a stunning route but lovely the rest of the year too. Cafes and independent shops dot the 2km path, with temples and shrines offering tempting detours along the way. The canal was built in the Meiji period to improve the local economy and continues to do so for this small community. Local philosopher Kitaro Nishida would use the path as for meditation during his daily stroll to his University campus and the calming atmosphere makes it easy to see why, even today. As the founder of the Kyoto School of Philosophy, nishida knew a thing or two about meditation, and the opportunity to absorb the sounds of running water and the scent of trees was one he couldn’t miss. A professor during the Meiji era, he was a keen explorer of merging Western and Japanese culture, exploring the concept of a ‘being place’, called basho in Japanese. Depending on the season and your schedule, the path can be explored and followed for around two hours, but you can be speedier if you have no blossom photos to take, coffee to sip or temples to visit. If you do have the time, however, be sure to check out Honen-in and Eikando, especially in autumn. Otoyo Jinja is a fun mouse-based detour, while the final point of Nanzen-ji is home to rock gardens and great views.
Nature-River

Getting there

The path begins a few minutes away from Ginkakuji, and is accessible from the nearby bus stops served by numbers 5, 17, 32, 100, 102, 203 and 204 if heading north to south. If you’re traveling north, head to Nanzenji or Eikando Temples and start from there.

Travel time
0 hours 10 minutes
12:00 - 14:00
Higashiyama
Japan, 〒605-0826 京都府京都市東山区桝屋町清水2丁目
A twisting district of cobbled roads and looming pagodas, Higashiyama is a pleasure to explore. A throwback to the feudal-era, the historic quarter houses tea houses alongside contemporary coffee shops and can easily fill an afternoon. The streets offer a taste of old Kyoto and are a popular spot for those looking to rent kimono or yukata for a stroll with plenty of photo-perfect backdrops to be found. Once serving pilgrims and now supported by tourism, the shops and restaurants of the area have everything from colourful sweets to traditional wooden toys - making it a great place to stock up on gifts for family and friends. Some of the highlights to seek out include the Ninenzaka and Sannenzaka streets - they are two of the best preserved areas and strikingly photogenic. The Yasaka Pagoda and nearby Koshindo are two fo the most popular spots, with thousands of bright kukri-zaru (cloth monkeys) strung up in the grounds of the latter. Kodai-ji temple is home to some of the country’s most impressive zen gardens - one rock and one in the traditional tsukiyama style featuring a pond and borrowed scenery. One of Higashiyama’s seasonal highlights is Hanatoro - a lantern-filled event which takes place in March each year with illuminations and extended opening hours.
Settlement-Neighbourhood

Getting there

Higashiyama can be found to the east of Kyoto, accessible from Kyoto Kawaramachi or Kiyomizu-Gojo subway stations on the Keihan Main Line or Higashiyama on the Tozai Subway line. If you’re arriving from the Philosopher’s path, simply head towards Yasaka Shrine or the Keage Incline and explore from there.

Travel time
0 hours 5 minutes
14:00 - 16:00
Kiyomizudera
1-chōme-294 Kiyomizu, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto, 605-0862, Japan
Providing unbeatable views of the city below, Kiyomizudera is known for its expansive wooden veranda but has love shrines, lucky fountains and more. Founded in 778 on the site of Otowa waterfall, its name means ‘Pure Water Temple’ and is another of the city’s UNESCO World Heritage Sites. While it was originally associated with the ancient Hosso sect of Buddhism, but in the mid-20th century severed ties and chose to form its own Kita Hosso sect. The main hall is vast, with many areas not open to the public. The wooden stage, however, is open to all and offers exceptional views across pinks in spring and golden hues in autumn. The main hall was built without a single nail and houses the thousand armed kannon statue, complete with 11 faces. The waters that lend the temple its name can still be reached, with three spouts offering longevity, luck in love or academic success. While there is nothing stopping you from sipping from all three it i considered greedy, so perhaps stick to one. Behind the main building lies Jishu Shrine, known for offering romantic fortune and matchmaking. Those seeking love must make the journey from one rock to another while blindfolded, and you’ll no doubt see many attempt it - with or without the subtle help of friends (and partners) nearby. Hours: 6am - 6pm (extended for seasonal illuminations) [Images: 1. Maria Michelle/pixabay, 2. LCB, 3. LCB]
Culture-Shrine Culture-Temple
Standard 400.00 JPY

Getting there

Kiyomizudera is best walked to from the Higashiyama district, with signposts aplenty. The nearest train station is Kiyomizu-gojo which is about 15 minutes away and served by the Keihan Main Line. Buses 100 and 206 from Kyoto station will take you to Kiyomizu-michi stop which is a ten-minute walk from the temple entrance.

Travel time
0 hours 5 minutes
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About the author

I've been in Japan for five years and am lucky enough to be able to explore the islands, neighborhoods and mountains of the country for work. I particularly enjoy focusing on rural regeneration projects and still have plenty of places I want to visit.

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