How to Spend 3 Days in Prague

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Itinerary by: Matt Lynch
5 months ago
Travel Writer
Accomodation-Hotel Culture-Abbey Culture-Art Gallery Culture-Bridge Culture-Castle Culture-Cathedral Culture-Church Culture-Historical Building Culture-Landmark Culture-Monastery Culture-Palace Culture-Statue Culture-Tower Eat & Drink-Bar Eat & Drink-Restaurant Exercise-Cycling Exhibition-Architecture Exhibition-Artwork Exhibition-Exhibition Exhibition-History Exhibition-Tour Nature-Gardens Nature-Hill Nature-Park Nature-River Nature-View point Settlement-Community Settlement-Neighbourhood Transport-Boat trip
Duration: 4 days

INTRODUCTION Prague is the capital of the Czech Republic and a gem of Europe with a medieval history stretching back over a millennium. It’s a place steeped in culture, with the city allegedly being founded in the 8th century. Through the ages, it has been the capital of the King of Bohemia and the residence of numerous Holy Roman Emperors. It is a city that holds an intriguing communist legacy with influences from multiple cultures and political regimes. Over generations, the architecture of the city has taken influence from Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Baroque styles – to name a few. Despite being relatively compact in size, Prague packs an incredible number of world-renowned sites into such a small area. From the Old Town Square with its Astronomical Clock to the Charles bridge and the Lesser Town with Prague Castle poised above – Prague has earned the status of a UNESCO World Heritage Site for many of the city’s features. Aside from its architectural beauty, Prague is also a hot-house for beer drinkers and ale aficionados – offering some of the best beer in Europe. Prague’s citizens allegedly consume more beer per capita than any other city in the world. Where else can you get a vast menu offering exclusively draft beers? No visit to Prague would be complete without tasting some of the local Czech cuisine. Munching on a donut-like pastry as you wander around the city streets or tucking into a bowl of goulash in one of the city’s numerous restaurants is quite the experience! Not to mention the famous beer snacks – pickled sausage, sauerkraut soup, bread dumpling soup – that should be eaten alongside your beer to help you soak up some of the drinks! This guide for 3 days in Prague provides you with a travel itinerary that includes all the best sites and top things to do in this wonderful European city. IS 3 DAYS IN PRAGUE LONG ENOUGH? Prague is a beautiful destination packed with historical and cultural sites. Despite this, for a capital city, it is relatively small. Even on foot the main sites of the city can be explored in a relatively short time. 3 Days in Prague is long enough to see the key highlights of the city. However, for those wishing to dive deeper into the wonderful array of museums, and explore the city’s hidden sites and backstreets, 4 days is a more suitable itinerary. The Czech Republic is much more than Prague alone. In the surrounding countryside and other settlements close by, there are numerous UNESCO sites well worth visiting in their own right. For example: 3 hours outside of Prague is Český Krumlov , a magnificent 13th-century castle that’s the highlight of South Bohemia; an hour east of Prague is Kutná Hora , a formerly prosperous silver-mining city with a stunning church and monastery; an hour south of Prague is Karlštejn Castle , famous for being the holding place of numerous royal jewels and invaluable artefacts over centuries. Spending 3 days in Prague allows you to see the best of this city, but to really get to know its past, and to discover the culture of the Czech Republic as a whole, you could do more wrong than extend your trip to include a 4 or even 5-day itinerary. GETTING TO PRAGUE Prague, like many cities in central Europe, is well-connected by railways. Many choose to visit Prague and a string of other nearby cities such as Budapest, Vienna, and Bratislava, in one trip due to how well-connected they are. This is a popular city to visit for those interrailing around Europe. Prague has an international airport offering inexpensive flights from all across Europe and even long-haul intercontinental flights too. The airport is accessible by taxi, airport shuttle (must be pre-booked), or public bus. Bus 100 and 119 runs to Terminal 1 and 2 taking 20-30 minutes from the city centre. Prague can also be reached by bus with cheap bus services such as Flixbus linking transport hubs all over Europe. Busses run from the Praha Florenc bus station. TRANSPORT DURING 3 DAYS IN PRAGUE To put the size of the city into perspective, walking from one of the city’s most southern sites (Vyšehrad) to one of its most northern (Prague Zoo) would take you 1.5 to 2 hours. Walking from the eastern Powder Tower, over the river, and up the hill to the western Strahov Monastery, would take 40 minutes to an hour. It is a compact city which is of great benefit to those wishing to spend 3 days in Prague as you will seldom have to worry about transport. Walking around the city is far from grueling and in many ways is one of the joys of a visit to Prague anyway. Taking the time to admire the architecture of the old buildings, the cobbled streets, the marketplaces, and the winding Vltava river are all aspects that add to the experience. You are not limited to walking alone. There is a small 3-line Pražské metro service that can be used. Line A (green), Line B (yellow), and Line C (red). There is also a lovely tram service that operates at street-level with 34 lines stretching throughout the city. For those spending 3 days in Prague, there is a 72-hour ticket that can be purchased for 310 CZK (12 EUR) which includes bus, tram, and metro. This can be the perfect option if you’ve been walking all day and are wishing to get back to your accommodation. There are a number of short ferries included in the Prague transport system. However, it may be worth considering booking a place on a sightseeing boat trip along the river to see the best of Prague from its waters. WHAT TO EAT FOR 3 DAYS IN PRAGUE - Trdelník – originally from Transylvania, this tasty snack is a halfway house between churros and doughnuts. The batter is deep-fried, rolled in sugar, then dipped in chocolate and filled with ice cream. You'll see them rotating on hot rods in stalls all across the city. - Goulash – a thick meat stew that is served with vegetables and dumplings. Beef is the traditional choice of meat, but you may come across chicken and pork too. Occasionally the goulash is served in a bread bowl which is gradually consumed with the stew. What a fantastic invention! - Gingerbread – a spiced sugary biscuit made using ginger, cloves, nutmeg, and cinnamon. Often consumed around christmas. - Palačinky – a sweet Czech pancake that is thin, like a French crepe. Often served at food markets and local restaurants, this tasty dish can be found all throughout the city. Although not as common, it’s possible to get Palačinky with savoury fillings such as meat, cheese, potato, and spinach. - Bohemian Sauerkraut Soup (Kyselice) – a thick soup made of meat, sour cabbage, and enriched with cream. - Traditional Beerhouse Snacks - local ham, salami, pickled wiener sausages, onions, and hard bread. Anything that goes down well with a pint of pilsner! - Svíčková – a very popular meal in Prague. The dish is composed of braised beef with vegetables, spices, and Czech bread dumplings (knedlíky). - CAFÉ ELEKTRIC – a restaurant serving easy-eat food and world cuisine - great for brunch. - Vinohradský Pivovar – restaurant and brewery serving draught beer and delicious Czech food. - Perníčkův Sen - for the best gingerbread in Prague! It has more variations of gingerbread than you could imagine. Some are dipped in chocolate, others sprinkled with dried fruit and nuts; some are decorated with icing, others come in different shapes and sizes. One thing's for sure, they're all delicious! - Lokál – a chain of Czech beer halls with 6 locations throughout the city. Serving traditional food, such as Gothaj salami, chicken paprikash, Prague ham with horseradish sauce, and Přeštice sausage – all washed down with a pint of beer. - Restaurant Mlýnec - for a fine dining experience and to sample some contemporary Czech food. Riverside views and live jazz most evenings. - Lehká Hlava - vegetarian food served in a rustic, old building with a quirky interior. WHAT TO DRINK FOR 3 DAYS IN PRAGUE? - Beer – Prague, and the Czech Republic as a whole, has some of the most delicious beers in all of Europe. From Bavarian-style Pilsner to fruity Weiss-beers, and hoppy amber ales. No visit to Prague would be complete without sampling some of these drinks from one of the many coveted beer halls dotted throughout the city. - Wine – 90% of the Czech wine is sourced from the region of Moravia, 150 miles outside of Prague. There are 2 Vinograf wine bars in the city that serve the best selection of Czech wine – well worth sampling. - Black Angel’s Bar – a sophisticated Bohemian cocktail bar on the edge of the Old Town Square. - Bugsy's Bar – a modern and stylish cocktail bar near the Old Town. - Lokál – a chain of Czech beer halls with 6 locations throughout the city. - Tretter's – an upmarket 1930s New York style cocktail bar. - U Kunštátů – a beer hall in an old stone building serving tasting flights of craft beer. - Prague Beer Museum – a pub where you can sample a selection of the 30 draft beers. There are a few to try from but the most popular is on the eastern riverbank by the Old Town Bridge. - Zlý Casy – a microbrewer with some of the largest beer selections in the whole of the city. WHERE TO STAY FOR 3 DAYS IN PRAGUE? In Prague, there are a huge range of options for accommodation such as hotels, hostels, apartments, boutique establishments, and B&Bs. Finding a place to stay won’t be a problem and you can be sure wherever you choose for your 3 days in Prague, it will be within walking distance of everywhere else. It’s more important to find the right neighbourhood in the city that suits you. The Old Town (Staré Město) is the busiest area of Prague with many accommodation options in what is considered to be the heart of the city. These hotels can be overcrowded and overpriced but if you want to be in the middle of it all, this is a good place to look. However, considering how accessible Prague is, you may want to look slightly further afield to find more reasonably priced accommodation that is just as charming and still within a stone’s throw of all the main features. Mala Strana (Lesser Town) is a quieter area of the city with a lower pedestrian footfall at night. It is filled with plenty of authentic local bars and restaurants whilst being within walking distance of the Old Town over the river. It is a charming part of the city and a wonderful place to stay but accommodation can be quite pricey. New Town (Nové Město) is another great option if you are more budget-conscious. Despite being built in the 14th-century, it is a hub for commercial tastes and is dominated by 20th-century architecture. It is centrally located and is a convenient alternative to the Old Town for a lower price. BEST TIME OF YEAR TO VISIT PRAGUE During the warm summer months, people flock to the city to make the most of the sun-basked streets and the mild, pleasant evenings. Accommodation and tourist sites become booked up and prices all across the city rise. Getting around without encountering any crowds is a difficulty. To maximise the good weather, but avoid some of the crowds of sightseers, it’s worth opting for the shoulder seasons of late spring and early autumn. In May and September, temperatures can still hover around 20 degrees whilst prices and visitor numbers are notably lower. If shopping is key to your visit, December may be the best time to spend 3 days in Prague. The city transforms into an old-style Christmas market with merchants selling hand-made souvenirs and authentic Bohemian trinkets. The general atmosphere in the city is magical with snow not unheard of. It is low season, with discount prices and thin crowds reflecting this. BONUS LOCATIONS (IF YOU HAVE TIME) - Jewish District (Josefov) – an old Jewish ghetto where resident Jews were forced to live from the 13th-century onwards. Over the years, this neighborhood grew, as Jews from many countries re-located to this district. There are numerous houses, buildings, and synagogues on display in this area. - Národní Museum – founded in 1818, the National Museum is actually a series of buildings located throughout the city with the most spectacular building on the edge of Wenceslas Square. - The Powder Tower (Prašná Brána) – a 15th-century tower gate on the eastern edge of the Old Town. It was originally constructed to mark the start of the Royal Route to Prague Castle. There is an observation deck 44 metres above the city. - Wenceslas Square – the second most famous square in Prague following the Old Town Square. It is actually more of an avenue, with the street lined with restaurants, shops, and hotels. Photo Credits: Dmitry Goykolov on Unsplash

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Day 1

City Centre and the Old Town Square

See the highlights of the Old Town Square before taking a stroll along the Vltava river to the incredible Vyšehrad castle.
09:00 - 10:00
Old Town Square
Staroměstské nám., 110 00 Staré Město, Czechia
The oldest square in Prague, dating back to the 10th century, with a whole host of Gothic buildings and sublime medieval architecture. Some of the most revered features include the Old Town Hall with the Astronomical Clock, the Church of Our Lady before Týn, and the St. Nicholas Church – along with numerous other features and statues. Throughout December, a festive market is erected with an enormous Christmas tree. Walking around the market stalls and immersing yourself in the magical atmosphere of this ancient city is a remarkable experience. Top Tip: Climb the Old Town Hall Tower to look down on the square and get a 360-degree view over the surrounding city. Best seen at night – entrance is ticketed. Picture Credits: Kaishin | OneLushLife on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
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Notes

The earlier you start you day, the quieter the Old Town Square will be.

Getting there

Walk from your accommodation and enjoy the city waking up around you.

10:30 - 11:30
Old Town Hall & Astronomical Clock
Staroměstské nám. 4/1, 110 00 Praha-Staré Město, Czechia
A 600-year-old timepiece mounted on the southern wall of the Old Town Hall which exhibits a mastery of medieval engineering. An astronomical dial represents the position of the sun and the moon. Then, as the clock strikes the hour, the “Walk of the Apostles” occurs where twelve apostle figures can be seen and the figurine of a skeleton which represents death. It is the world’s oldest clock that is still operating. Top Tip: The clock rings every hour, on the hour, where you can see its moving components and a bird popping out. Understandably, this is an incredibly busy time. You can make the most of this by visiting some of the other nearby sites to take advantage of the lull. Try to visit the clock either first thing in the morning or at night, to avoid the crowds. Photo Credits: Abdullah Yılmaz on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
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Notes

Stick around to watch the clock ring on the hour, but if the crowds are too big, move on and come back to it later!

Getting there

The Astronomical Clock is on the side of the Old Town Hall right in the middle of the Old Town Square.

Travel time
0 hours 5 minutes
11:30 - 12:30
Church of Our Lady before Týn.
Staroměstské nám., 110 00 Staré Město, Czechia
The black spires on this church are one of the iconic features of Prague. Rising 80 metres on the top of intricately carved stone towers, this landmark building can be spotted from all over the city. The sharp turrets sub-divide into 8 spires spread across 2 layers. Picture Credits: Václav Vančura on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
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Notes

Make sure you spend some time admiring the architecture of the building from the outside before you head inside to look around the church.

Getting there

The church is on the eastern side of the Old Town Square, close to the Old Town Hall.

Travel time
0 hours 5 minutes
13:30 - 14:30
Vltava river
Legion Bridge, most Legií, 110 00 Praha 1, Czechia
The Vltava river, fondly known as the Czech national river, runs through the centre of Prague and acts as a defining feature of the city. Simply walking along its banks and enjoying the beauty of its placid waters can be a joy in itself. Just taking the tram to one of the river-side stations then walking back into Prague along the river can be a wonderful way to experience the city. If you take the tram to Podolske Vodarna, to the south of Prague, then you can stroll back to the city via the Vyšehrad to explore a number of famous sites at once. Alternatively, a visit to the Prague Zoo provides you with the opportunity to see the river leading north out of the city. Top Tip: If you want to see the city and the river from the comfort of a cosy cabin, consider taking a riverboat cruise. There are a variety of options here including one-hour sightseeing tours, jazz boats, and dine and cruise tours. Photo Credits: Dimitry Anikin on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
Culture-Bridge Nature-River Transport-Boat trip

Notes

This is only the first of many times you will enjoy seeing the river during your 3 days in Prague. However, it's unlikely you will visit this southern section again so enjoy the sights while you're walking along the promenade.

Getting there

The first sight of the river will be when you walk east from the Old Town Square to the Charles Bridge. From here, follow the river south past 4 other bridges - the Legion Bridge being the most famous - before you reach Vyšehrad.

14:15 - 14:30
Dancing House
Jiráskovo nám. 1981/6, 120 00 Praha-Nové Město, Czechia
The Dancing House (Tančící Dům) is one of the modern highlights of Prague’s skyline. A warped structure that embraces “deconstructivist” architecture. This intriguing curved building stands on the edge of the Vltava river with a classy top-floor restaurant offering excellent views of the city. Photo Credits: Dušan Veverkolog on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
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Notes

The Dancing House can just be admired from the outside. Alternatively, it is a hotel and restaurant if you wish to stay there or visit for a meal.

Getting there

The Dancing House is enroute to Vyšehrad, along the Vltava river, no diversion is required.

14:30 - 16:00
Vyšehrad
Vyšehrad, V Pevnosti 159/5b, 128 00 Praha 2-Vyšehrad, Czechia
A fortified castle with many underground passages, sweeping grounds, and the remains of a medieval basilica. The fort is built on a rocky outcrop above the Vltava river with the gardens facing out onto the water. Considering the delicate architecture, it’s remarkable such an old building has made it through the ages unscathed. The foundations are estimated to have been laid in the 10th century with features added over the years. The fort is often referred to as “Prague’s second castle” or “Upper Castle”. According to legend, Libuse (daughter of the Czech ruler Krok) proclaimed the future glory of Prague on this exact spot many years ago! Despite its beauty, Vyšehrad still has a relatively low footfall from tourists. The main feature is the Church of St. Paul and St. Peter, with the characteristic black spires being visible from all over the city. Top Tip: Few people consider visiting Vyšehrad for its views of the city, but from its position on a rocky hilltop, the views upriver are sensational. See Prague from above and admire the colourful rooftops and winding streets lining the city below. Picture Credits: Lukas Marek on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
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Notes

It's possible to spend the whole afternoon exploring Vyšehrad but 1.5 hours will suffice to see the highlights of the castle and its grounds.

Getting there

To save you walking back, there are a number of tram stations around Vyšehrad to take you back to the city. Alternatively, you can walk up to Karlovo náměstí and hop on the metro.

Day 2

Charles Bridge and Malá Strana

Rise nice and early to cross the sensational Charles Bridge into the Lesser Town. Stroll around the old cobbled streets before climbing the hill to spend the remainder of the afternoon at Prague Castle. Finish the day at Letna Park with a cold Pilsner in hand looking over the city of Prague below.
09:00 - 10:00
Charles Bridge
Karlův most, 110 00 Praha-Praha 1, Czechia
One of the highlights in Prague, adding to the city’s medieval history, is the 14th century Charles Bridge. It’s the city’s oldest bridge, commissioned by King Charles IV, and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Building began in 1357 after Judith’s Bridge was destroyed in a flood. The Charles Bridge was built on a stronger sandstone foundation, to withstand the power of the Vltava river. On the eastern side of the bridge is the Old Town Bridge Tower, leading towards the city centre. On the western bank are the two Lesser Town Bridge Towers, which mark the entrance to the Lesser Town. It’s possible to climb the towers on either side of the bridge to gain views of Prague, the Vltava river, and the flocks of pedestrians crossing the bridge. The towers are ticketed. It is 516 metres long and 10 metres wide which allowed horse and carriage to cross over the river. This was an extremely important feature as, up until 1841, the Charles Bridge was the only connection between Prague Castle and the Old Town. Over the years, the Charles Bridge has been adorned with the statues of 30 saints - designed in Baroque style - the most famous of which is St. Jan Nepomucký – noticeable due to a halo of stars above his head. Today, local artists and musicians line the bridge busking and selling their wares. Top Tip: The bridge gets extremely busy in the middle of the day, especially during summer. Visit early in the morning or at night to avoid congestion and to see the bridge in peace. It’s worth visiting numerous times at different hours as there’s always something new to admire about the architecture. Photo Credits: Martin Krchnacek on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
Culture-Bridge Culture-Historical Building Culture-Landmark Culture-Statue

Notes

As with the Old Town Square, the earlier you visit the Charles Bridge the more you will be able to get out of it. If you visit first thing in the morning it will be quiet, without many tourists, giving you an opportunity to appreciate its wonder.

Getting there

Depending on where you're staying, the bridge is either directly west of the Old Town Square or east of Lesser Town.

Travel time
0 hours 10 minutes
10:00 - 11:30
Lesser Town (Malá Strana)
Malá Strana, Prague 1, Czechia
On the western bank of the Vltava river is the Malá Strana, also known as the Lesser Town. It is a remarkably pretty quarter of Prague with quaint winding streets and picturesque colourful houses. Just wandering around its cobbled streets, browsing the shops, is a joy. At night the restaurants come alive and the streets are lit with lanterns providing a glimpse into the traditional side of Prague. Although this is one of the oldest districts in Prague, many of the buildings were destroyed during the great fires of 1541. St. Nicholas Church is one of the finest churches in the Lesser Town, notably because it took more than 100 years to build! The Wallenstein Palace (Waldstein Palace) is another highlight with its magnificent gardens and courtyards. Top Tip: When walking through Mala Strana, it’s worth including a visit to the Lennon Wall. It is an open-air graffiti space and art mural dedicated to the late Beatles front-man John Lennon. Originally started in 1982 as an anti-communist protest, much of the artwork is political with references to world peace and other inspirational quotes. Photo Credits: Polina Podlesnaya on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
Settlement-Community Settlement-Neighbourhood

Notes

You can divert to some of the famous museums in Lesser Town (such as the Kafka Museum) but one of its charms lies in simply strolling about the streets and taking the atmosphere in. There are many restaurants and cafes to visit for a morning coffee or some late breakfast.

Getting there

Lesser Town is not a particularly large area. Just amble about the parks and winding streets letting your head guide you. Keep in mind you want to gradually head north in the direction of the Prague Castle up on the hill!

11:30 - 14:00
Prague Castle and St. Vitus Cathedral
119 08 Prague-Prague 1, Czechia
On a hill above Lesser Town is the majestic and expansive Prague Castle. This 9th-century castle is steeped in history – holding court for the Kings of Bohemia and Holy Roman Emperor – and today still marks the official office of the President of the Czech Republic. It is one of the largest ancient castles in the world with grounds spread over 70,000 square metres. Thoroughly deserving of its UNESCO status, the Prague Castle is a must-visit destination. It’s easily possible to spend a few hours here visiting the grounds, buildings, moat, and even watching the changing of the guard. Prague Castle is a dominating feature of the city skyline set high upon the hillside of the Castle District (Hradčany). From below it appears to be its own city, with one of the defining buildings being the St. Vitus Cathedral – the grandest and most important church in the Czech Republic. St. Vitus Cathedral contains the burial place of many Bohemian Kings, Roman Emperors, and historic Czechoslovakian figures. Built over 1000 years ago, and then expanded and redesigned multiple times over generations, the cathedral now exhibits a variety of architectural styles from Romanesque to Gothic to Baroque. Top Tip: There are many impressive views from the ramparts and gardens of Prague Castle. There are panoramas from both ends of the grounds with The Black Tower offering excellent views over the old city. This is free to do and is best visited at sunset to make the most of this location. Photo Credits: William Zhang on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
Culture-Castle Culture-Church Culture-Historical Building Culture-Landmark Culture-Palace Nature-Park Nature-View point
Standard 250.00 CZK
Group 500.00 CZK
Students 125.00 CZK
Kids 125.00 CZK Under 16

Notes

It's possible to spend a good part of the day visiting Prague Castle. There are numerous tours you can take around the castle and around St Vitus Cathedral. There are also some lovely walks in the grounds with views over the city. Make sure to eat either a late breakfast or prepare for a late lunch as you may well spend a few hours inside the castle with limited food options.

Getting there

The main entrance is from the eastern end via the Old Castle Stairs. If you are using the metro to get to Prague Castle, the closest station is Malostranská.

15:00 - 16:00
Letná Park and Gardens
Letenské sady, 170 00 Praha 7-Letná, Czechia
To the north of Prague, on the far side of the Vltava river, are the lush Letná Gardens. Providing gorgeous views over the rooftops and famous landmarks of Prague, this is the perfect place to escape the bustle of the city. It’s a peaceful spot to spend an afternoon, with many locals using the area for outdoor activities and recreational pursuits such as walking, running, cycling, and having picnics. An interesting historical feature is the Metronome statue in the centre of the park. It marks the spot where a statue of the former Soviet leader Joseph Stalin was positioned before being destroyed in 1962. Top Tip: There are many stalls selling takeaway cups of beer during the summer and plenty of Octoberfest-style benches to sit on and enjoy the view. Zahradní restaurace Letenský zámeček is one of the best beer gardens, situated amongst rows of trees and with a stunning panorama over the city. Photo Credits: Fernando Lavin on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
Exercise-Cycling Nature-Gardens Nature-Hill Nature-Park Nature-View point

Notes

Finish off the day by walking around the leafy green Letna Park which overlooks the river.

Getting there

Getting to Letna Park is only a short walk from Prague Castle but as the park is relatively long, it can take up to 30 minutes to reach the far side. If you're returning to the Old Town you can either cross over the Štefániků or Čechův bridges and be back at the Old Town Square in less than 20 minutes.

Travel time
0 hours 30 minutes

Day 3

Petrin Hill and Strahov

Spend the morning exploring the lower reaches of the Lesser Town before walking around Petrin Hill and enjoying the picturesque views and landscaped gardens. After lunch, visit the ancient Strahov Monastery and sample some of the monk-brewed beer before strolling back down the hill into Prague.
09:00 - 12:00
Petřín Hill and Tower
Petřínské sady 633, 118 00 Praha 1, Czechia
Petřín Hill is covered in green space with numerous landscaped gardens and leafy parks. It is the perfect place for a peaceful stroll with a range of excellent views. It is a common recreation area for Prague locals with the rose gardens being a popular destination. When walking around the park, make sure to visit the Memorial to the Victims of Communism to ponder over the dark days of communism that gripped Czech history. Atop the hill is a cast iron structure which is 63.5 metres tall called The Petřín Tower. Despite the tower being relatively small, the viewing platform actually reaches 318 metres into the sky – due to it being on the brow of Petřín Hill! There are 299 steps to the top where you’ll be greeted by a stunning view of the city. On a clear day, it’s possible to see all the way to Snezka, the highest mountain in the Czech Republic, 150 km away. Top Tip: If you are not keen on walking up the hill, you can hop on the charming funicular railway that rides to the top. The departure point is at Ujezd street in the Lesser Town, near Ujezd tram stop. The funicular forms part of the general city transport network which means a standard metro ticket is valid. Photo Credits: Karl Köhler on Unsplash
Article By: Matt Lynch
Culture-Landmark Culture-Tower Nature-Gardens Nature-Hill Nature-View point
Standard 150.00 CZK
Group 350.00 CZK
Students 80.00 CZK

Notes

Take your time walking around the parks and gardens, visiting the statues, and going up the Petrin Tower. If you're coming from the Old Town, try crossing over the Legion Bridge to view the cluster of islands in the river. Coming from this direction also allows you to explore the southern part of Malá Strana.

Getting there

If you're staying in Malá Strana, it's right on your doorstep, to the south west. If you're staying in the Old Town, you can walk there in 45 minutes.

Travel time
0 hours 45 minutes
13:00 - 15:00
Strahov Monastery
Strahovské nádvoří 1, 118 00 Praha 1, Czechia
A stunning site in Prague and a location that is often overlooked by most itineraries of the city. The 12th-century monastery is nestled on a hill outside of the city near Petrin Hill and Prague castle. It's reached by crossing the Charles Bridge and following the street up the hill. Inside is a high-ceilinged Baroque church with stucco-paneled halls. Lining the walls of the Theological and Philosophical halls are countless volumes of leather-bound books and polished wooden bookshelves. Spaced throughout the rooms of the Strahov Library, and amongst the rare manuscripts and maps , are many old globes and other intricate statues. Top Tip: Visit the Strahov Monastery Brewery next door. A 17th-century brewery that serves outstanding beers and ales. Photo Credits: Hieu Vu Minh
Article By: Matt Lynch
Culture-Abbey Culture-Art Gallery Culture-Cathedral Culture-Church Culture-Historical Building Culture-Monastery Exhibition-Architecture Exhibition-Artwork Exhibition-History Exhibition-Tour
Standard 150.00 CZK
Group 300.00 CZK
Students 80.00 CZK
Kids 0.00 CZK Under 18

Notes

Explore the monastery and take in the views of the city. Visit some of the bars and restaurants on this side of the city and enjoy the fantastic panorama over Prague while you're at it!

Getting there

A short walk from Petrin Hill. As you've already climbed up the hill, there isn't much more walking to be done as the Strahov Monastery is also up on the ridge.

Travel time
0 hours 10 minutes
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About the author

I have visited nearly 50 countries so far with some of my favourite destinations being: New Zealand, Norway, Japan, Mongolia, Iceland. I love hiking and all activities that involve exploring the outdoors. If you're interested in nature, walking, and adventures outdoors then you're going to enjoy my articles! Check out my website for some other travel blogs from around the world: https://mattwalkwild.com/ .

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