Holocaust Memorial Museum

Vicente Quintero
Article By: Vicente Quintero
2 months ago
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Culture-Museum

In the heart of Berlin, near the Brandenburg Gate, the Holocaust Memorial Museum stands as Germany's most important commemorative work to date. It is a stone-forest testimony that recalls the tragedy and suffering of the Jewish people during World War 2. Also known as the History Museum of the Monument to the Murdered Jews in Europe, this is the memorial to the Holocaust victims. I would suggest visiting it more than once if you are traveling with a group of friends since it allows you to share your own inner experience and thoughts. The origin of this Holocaust Memorial dates back to an initiative in the late 1980s promoted by journalist Lea Rosh and historian Eberhard Jäckel. In 1999, the German Parliament approved the bill for its construction, following the project of Peter Eisenman and the engineer Buro Happold. Its developers wanted it to defy and confront the notion of the monument itself. The masterpiece seeks to represent a theoretically ordered system that has lost contact with human reason. The device also expresses a radical approach to the traditional concept of a funerary monument, devoid of symbolism. As a stelae field, it intends to leave no one indifferent by disrupting one's thoughts and feelings. Therefore, everyone has their own personal and subjective experience inside. However, the monument still manages to transmit some concepts in an objective way for everyone. The memorial is shaped like a wave from different heights, placements, and shapes. Its unevenness can produce a certain feeling of dizziness and overwhelmingness since it does not have a central nucleus. For some, the blocks represent tombstones, and their gray color is the ashes of the bodies of the murdered Jews. Its inclination apparently generates instability and the narrow paths that open a feeling of stress, isolation, and suffocation between them. The architect himself, Eisenman, stated that the museum was not designed with a single pattern. A memorial that aims to keep the memory alive and also prevent it from happening again. If you are spending a few days in Berlin, this is a must-see destination. Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, there are few restrictions for visitors planning to visit the place. Admission is free. Photo credit: Jared Lisack on Unsplash.com
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  • Cora-Berliner-Straße 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany
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    Standard Free
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    Rainy day
    Family friendly
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    Tourist must-do

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